Development

Charles Goodhart, Anthony Venables, 17 January 2020

When the industries that have sustained our cities decline, how can we regenerate urban areas? At the SUERF conference in Amsterdam, Tony Venables and Charles Goodhart tell Tim Phillips that redevelopment policies may have made regional inequality and social conflict worse.

Piritta Sorsa, Jens Arnold, Paula Garda, 13 January 2020

Economic growth in Latin America has been persistently lower and more erratic than the emerging economies of Asia, largely due to low productivity borne out of both weak competition and a large informal economy. This column analyses the various factors that have caused these conditions to exist in several Latin American countries, and how policies to counteract them have fared. For significant progress, a detailed strategy of simplifying regulations, easing administrative burdens, encouraging market entry, and reducing trade barriers is required to formalise workers and encourage market competition.

Marvin Suesse, Nikolaus Wolf, 13 January 2020

There was a rapid spread of credit cooperatives in rural 19th-century Germany providing small-scale savings and loan services to previously unbanked people. This column shows how these cooperatives helped shift farm investment from grains to potentially profitable but more capital-intensive products, such as the production of meat and dairy. In cases like this, changes in the sector of economic activity are a better metric for the impact of microfinance than comparing income pre- and post-credit.

Erhan Artuc, Guido Porto, Bob Rijkers, 06 January 2020

Questions about who benefits from free trade – and at what cost – have resurfaced as part of the backlash against globalisation. This column uses data from 54 low- and middle-income countries to show that in a majority of cases, trade liberalisation increases both incomes and inequality. Most of these trade-offs resolve in favour of liberalisation; despite exacerbating income disparities, trade liberalisation creates overall social welfare gains. 

Bernard Hoekman, Ben Shepherd, 03 January 2020

Data weaknesses hamper analysis of how policies towards imports and exports of services, foreign direct investment and, more generally, regulation affects the operation of services sectors. Based on recently released regulatory policy data for 2016, this column uses machine learning methods to recreate to a high degree of accuracy the OECD’s Services Trade Restrictiveness Index to generate new estimates of services trade barriers for 23 developing countries. The analysis confirms that services policies are typically much more restrictive than tariffs on imports of goods, in particular in professional services and telecommunications. Developing countries tend to have higher services trade restrictions, but less so than has been found in research using data for the late 2000s.

Other Recent Articles:

Events

CEPR Policy Research