Development

Achyuta Adhvaryu, Sadish D, Anant Nyshadham, Jorge Tamayo, 19 August 2019

Managerial quality remains low in firms in developing countries. In the context of the Indian garment industry, this column shows that manager characteristics matter for productivity. It argues that firms might not know what constitutes good management or how valuable it is, and that they could benefit from screening and management training in these qualities.

Rabah Arezki, 19 August 2019

Algeria’s recent victory in the Africa Cup of Nations has united a country whose development model has frustrated its young and educated workforce. This column offers four lessons for economic development from the national football team’s success: on the role of competition and market forces, mobilising talent, the role of managers, and the importance of referees (i.e. regulation). 

Mara Squicciarini, 18 August 2019

Religion has had a complex relationship with technological progress throughout history, but there is scant empirical evidence on how conservative religious values may have affected the spread of new ideas and, by extension, economic development. This column examines the influence of the Catholic Church on technical education in France during the Second Industrial Revolution. It finds that areas with higher ‘religiosity’ had lower levels of industrial and economic development, suggesting that conservative religion can hamper economic development when it prevents primary schools from adopting technical education.

Arlan Brucal, Beata Javorcik, Inessa Love, 16 August 2019

The link between foreign ownership and environmental performance remains a controversial issue. Data from the Indonesian manufacturing census show that plants undergoing foreign acquisitions reduce their energy intensity by about 30% two years after acquisition by multinationals. This column argues that foreign direct investment can serve as a channel for the international transfer of environmentally friendly technologies and practices, thus directly contributing not only to economic growth but also to environmental progress. 

Catherine Guirkinger, Jean-Philippe Platteau, 14 August 2019

In 1965, the economist Ester Boserup argued that co-residential households would gradually converge under the combined forces of population pressure and market integration. Scholars inclined more towards culturalist anthropology disagreed, suggesting that because family structures depend on social norms and local culture, they will continue to differ across regions. Drawing on both traditions, this column argues that the evolution of family organisation depends on unexpected factors: land scarcity encourages complex households to split into nuclear households, but technical progress encourages farm consolidation. 

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