Economic history

Johannes Buggle, Thierry Mayer, Seyhun Orcan Sakalli, Mathias Thoenig, 25 January 2021

The recent refugee crisis has fuelled discussions about policies restricting immigration. This column quantifies the extent to which asylum policies affect emigration by analysing the migration decisions of German Jewish refugees in the 1930s. Policies have large effects on migration as the effects are multiplied through peers who influence each other in the decision to emigrate. Removing work restrictions for refugees in the recipient countries after the Nuremberg Laws in 1935 would have led to a 28% increase in Jewish emigration out of Germany.

Julia Cagé, Anna Dagorret, Pauline Grosjean, Saumitra Jha, 17 January 2021

The events at the US Capitol earlier this month echo important moments in history where rioters protesting the state include former veterans and political heroes. This column uses novel evidence on extreme right-wing supporters and Nazi collaborators in France to show how democratic values can be undermined by exogenous networks of influential individuals, including military heroes. Heroes are specially positioned to widen the ‘Overton window’ and legitimise views previously considered deeply repugnant. Social networks of individuals sharing such an identity can transmit and reinforce this influence, leading to escalating commitments that entrench political positions and make debiasing more difficult.

Dimitris K. Chronopoulos, Sotiris Kampanelis, Daniel Oto-Peralías, John O.S. Wilson, 09 January 2021

The enduring impact of ancient colonialism can still be felt in the economic geography of the Mediterranean region. This column combines historical data on ancient colonies with current data on economic outcomes to show that areas once colonised by the Phoenicians, Greeks, and Etruscans have higher population densities and enhanced economic activity to this day – effects due more to the colonisation episode than to geographic attributes. The impact of ancient colonialism can thus be traced back more than two millennia, to the origin of the Mediterranean urban system.

Mathias Thoenig, 08 January 2021

A new study uses detailed data on the persecution of Jews in Nazi Germany to investigate why individuals become refugees. Mathias Thoenig tells Tim Phillips about a simple policy that would have saved hundreds of thousands of lives in the 1930s, but is still ignored today.

Christine Binzel, Andreas Link, Rajesh Ramachandran, 24 December 2020

The use of a language in written and formal contexts that is distinct from the languages used in everyday communication – such as Latin in early modern Europe and Standard Arabic in the Arabic-speaking world, both past and present – comes with benefits, but also with costs. Drawing on publishing data from early modern Europe, this column shows that the Protestant Reformation led to a sudden and sharp rise in vernacular printing, such that by the end of the 16th century, the majority of works were printed in spoken tongues rather than in Latin. This transformation allowed broader segments of society to access knowledge. It also diversified the composition of authors and book content and had long-term consequences for economic development.

Other Recent Articles:

Vox eBooks

Events

CEPR Policy Research