Education

Philip Oreopoulos, Richard Patterson, Uros Petronijevic, Nolan Pope, 20 November 2018

Time studying is strongly correlated with grades earned, but the amount of time that students spend studying has declined dramatically. This column describes an intervention at three higher education campuses that offered coaching and help for students to plan their time. Students were highly engaged, but there was no effect at all on their grades. This is consistent with previous results that suggest this type of intervention does not change student behaviour in a sustained and meaningful way.

Joshua S. Goodman, Oded Gurantz, Jonathan Smith, 04 November 2018

Retaking college entrance exams can only improve students’ chances of being admitted to a college, yet little is known about students’ decisions to retake them and the impact of retaking. This column uses data on over 10 million SAT takers from the high school classes of 2006-2014 to show that the increases resulting from retaking are large enough to drive substantial improvements in college enrolment outcomes, and that retaking appears to close college enrolment gaps by income and race.

Stephen Machin, 26 October 2018

We know that increasing the school leaving age cuts crime, but why? Is it because kids who are most likely to commit crimes are learning things that make them more employable, or is just because they're off the streets? Tim Phillips talks to Steve Machin of the LSE about new research into the importance of these effects.

Brian Bell, Rui Costa, Stephen Machin, 14 October 2018

Changes to compulsory school leaving laws that force some people to stay in school longer have been shown to boost education and reduce crime. This column uses changes in such laws in the US to show that the driver behind the reduction in crime is not better employment outcomes, but ‘dynamic incapacitation’. Crime rates peak at age 18, and keeping teenagers in school during this key period can help ensure that they never proceed down the wrong track.

Maria Victoria Anauati, Sebastian Galiani, Ramiro Gálvez, 09 October 2018

Economics places a strong emphasis on publishing in a narrow set of top-tier journals. However, the reputation of a journal does not necessarily go hand in hand with citation performance. This column describes how citation patterns vary greatly across tiers, affecting both the total citations articles receive and the life cycles of their citations. Nonetheless, the results suggest that too much emphasis is placed on the top five journals. 

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