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John Hassler, Per Krusell, Morten Ravn, Kjetil Storesletten, 07 July 2020

The responses to Covid-19 have had direct economic consequences of historic proportions. In reaction to this challenge, this column was prepared by four main authors and then discussed within a large group of research-active macroeconomists who also signed the final document. The column discusses the nature of the shock and the challenges for economic policy in Europe in the current and next phases of the crisis. In addition to outlining some basic principles for guiding domestic economic policy, it also calls for clear communication of policy to minimise uncertainty, for cooperation across countries along several dimensions, and for a clear and unified strategy in the management of national debts.

Elena Carletti, Tommaso Oliviero, Marco Pagano, Loriana Pelizzon, Marti Subrahmanyam, 19 June 2020

The COVID-19 induced crisis has caused severe distress for the economy. This column estimates the profit and equity shortfalls triggered by the COVID-19 shock for a representative sample of Italian companies, including large, medium and small companies. A three-month lockdown is found lead to an aggregate annual drop in profits of €170 billion, with an implied equity erosion of €117 billion. Some 17% of all firms, employing over 800,000 workers, are estimated to face severe distress. Small and medium enterprises are affected disproportionately, with 17.2% of affected compared with 6.4% of large firms.

Maarten Verwey, Sven Langedijk, Robert Kuenzel, 09 June 2020

As Member States start to ease restrictions linked to the COVID-19 pandemic on citizens and businesses, EU leaders and institutions have turned their attention towards the medium-term recovery of their economies. In late May, the Commission presented its proposals for a recovery plan. This column provides a brief overview of the economic rationale for collective action and an assessment of the expected impact of the recovery plan proposed by the Commission.

Ignazio Angeloni, 26 May 2020

In 2012, at the peak of the euro crisis, the leaders of the EU launched the banking union, involving the transfer of large parts of the banking regulatory and supervisory framework from the national domain to the euro area. This column introduces a new report which takes stock of this reform so far and proposes policy measures to improve its performance. It identifies three strategic goals for regulatory and supervisory action aimed at reviving the banking union: reduce overbanking among weaker players; favour consolidation and enhance efficiency among the stronger ones; strengthen balance sheets further, while encouraging area-wide diversification. The proposed measures cover, among other areas, the crisis management mechanism, with a revamp of the instruments and functions of the Single Resolution Board; banking supervision, to enhance the ECB’s action in the micro and macroprudential fields; and the state-aid controls in the banking sector.

Agnès Bénassy-Quéré, Beatrice Weder di Mauro, 26 May 2020

After a period of hesitation, governments in Europe have reacted forcefully to the Covid-19 pandemic with various strategies combining social distancing, testing/quarantining, and lockdowns. During a pandemic, however, coordination is key and repairing corporate balance sheet and the single market, as well as economic recovery constitute common goods. This column takes stock of the progress on addressing the crisis on the three axes of European-level support – monetary, banking and fiscal policy. The EU Recovery plan that is taking shape looks promising and could represent a significant sign of European solidarity and unity. 

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