EU institutions

Nauro Campos, 22 June 2018

The issue of how to reform the EU is well discussed in research and policy. But through which institutions and in which order these reforms should take place is less well debated. Nauro Campos discusses the role of Europe’s institutions in its successes and failures. Based on the findings of the recent CEPR eBook, “Bretton Woods, Brussels, and Beyond: Redesigning the Institutions of Europe”, he suggests that the risks of not reforming these institutions are at least another recession across Europe, but also threats to the European project itself.

George Papaconstantinou, 21 June 2018

The policy discussion on euro area reform has entered a critical phase. This column, part of the VoxEU debate on euro area reform, attempts a ‘what if’ experiment based on the proposals in the recent CEPR Policy Insight. Focusing on the Greek case, it looks at the counterfactual case of such proposals having already been implemented at the outset of the crisis and examines their potential role in preventing the outbreak of the crisis or mitigating it once it was underway.

Jérémie Cohen-Setton, Shahin Vallee, 20 June 2018

The authors of the recent CEPR Policy Insight argue that the euro area needs an alternative to the current system of fiscal rules and financial penalties to discipline fiscally wayward members. This column, part of the VoxEU debate on euro area reform, argues that by not complementing their proposals with recommendations in the monetary realm, the authors have missed an opportunity to provide a balanced reform package that would not only increase fiscal discipline and risk sharing, but also enhance liquidity provision.

Rafael Doménech, Miguel Otero Iglesias , Federico Steinberg, 15 June 2018

Deepening of EMU cannot wait until all countries have carried out all their domestic reforms, both risk sharing and risk reduction need to proceed simultaneously. In fact, all euro area countries are exposed to the risk of an incomplete monetary and economic union but with very asymmetric costs. This column, part of the VoxEU debate on euro area reform, argues that this risk can only be tackled with common instruments and policies at the European level, whose mere existence will reduce not only its magnitude but also its asymmetric consequences. 

Nauro Campos, Jan-Egbert Sturm, 29 May 2018

Economists have discussed what to do to reform the European project and how, but have been silent on who and when. Which institutions and rules are needed and when? This column introduces a new eBook that makes the case such institutional questions are of fundamental importance for the future of Europe. The individual chapters distil the lessons from the institutional framework underpinning the Bretton Woods system and the globalisation wave that followed it. 

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