EU policies

Nauro Campos, Fabrizio Coricelli, 08 July 2019

This year has seen the 20th anniversary of the euro, but so far we have not seen many articles that take stock of the accomplishments and disillusionments of the single currency, and of how to improve it. This column hopes to change this by picking and discussing 20 papers that economists and policymakers should read, or re-read, and reflect upon in this 20th anniversary year.

Bo Becker, 27 June 2019

A new EU directive proposes important reforms to member countries’ corporate insolvency processes. This column argues that the directive is a step in the right direction but that it has crucial flaws in the way it envisions restructuring and priority of creditors. It also proposes a system – comparable to the US approach – in which restructuring and liquidation are alternative options triggered by insolvency, and that respects the absolute priority of creditors. 

Jean Pisani-Ferry, Jeromin Zettelmeyer, 18 June 2019

The 2017 proposals for euro area reform by a group of seven French and seven German economists triggered a considerable response, much of which featured in a dedicated debate here on Vox. This column introduces an eBook that brings together a selection of these contributions, and in doing so offers a comprehensive, state-of-the art, and accessible overview of the current discussion on euro area reforms.

Sébastien Jean, Anne Perrot, Thomas Philippon, 18 June 2019

Some policymakers believe that EU competition policy prevents the emergence of industrial champions. The column argues that Europe’s competition policy has successfully contained the rise in concentration and excess profits, and the EU should not follow the US in weakening its approach. Instead, the EU needs to strengthen its trade policy to be more assertive on reciprocity in market access and control of industrial subsidies. 

Stan Olijslagers, Annelie Petersen, Nander de Vette, Sweder Van Wijnbergen, 17 June 2019

The decade since the Global Crisis has seen central banks employ a range of monetary policy tools. This column draws two lessons from the unconventional monetary policy measures employed during the European sovereign debt crisis. First, central banks should communicate clearly – and with sufficient detail – in times of heightened market stress to lower tail risk perceptions in financial markets. Second, policies aimed at changing the relative supply within different asset classes have an impact on perceived crash risk, while measures aimed at easing financing costs of commercial banks do not.

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