EU policies

Adam Elbourne, Kan Ji, Bert Smid, 13 March 2019

Previous research has shown that changes to the size of the ECB’s balance sheet were followed by meaningful changes in macroeconomic aggregates. This column argues that the econometric technique these studies employed does not provide reliable estimates. Impulse responses to purported balance sheet shocks are statistically indistinguishable from those from nonsensical identification schemes. The effectiveness of the ECB’s balance sheet policies is therefore still unproven.

Carlo Altavilla, Wolfgang Lemke, Roberto Motto, Natacha Valla, 28 February 2019

The ECB Conference on Monetary Policy took place in Frankfurt from 29 to 30 October 2018. This column describes presentations on topics including the interaction of monetary policy and financial markets, the relevance of banks and credit flows for monetary policy transmission, and the current challenges for monetary policy frameworks and strategies. The conference provided a forum for academic research and the practice of central banking to meet. 

Benoît Coeuré, 25 February 2019

There is a growing debate in Europe as to whether recent shifts in global governance should be seen as a reason to strengthen the global role of the euro. This column explains that while the ECB does not take a view on foreign policy questions, the alignment between policies that will strengthen the euro’s global role and policies that are needed to make the euro area more robust, together with the implications for monetary policy that a stronger international role of the euro would have, make the debate relevant to the central bank.

Marco Buti, Maya Jollès, Matteo Salto, 19 February 2019

The launch of the Economic and Monetary Union in 1999 was a considerable challenge and a historic milestone. The first decade of its existence firmly established the euro as a credible construction. As this column describes, however, from 2008 onwards the economic and financial crisis in Europe laid bare the weaknesses of its initial construct. Some assumptions behind the EMU institutional setting had to be reconsidered and, in the following years, considerable efforts were made to strengthen the EMU. To complete the job, we need to rebuild trust and overcome the creditors/debtors divide. 

Giancarlo Corsetti, Aitor Erce, Timothy Uy, 13 February 2019

During the euro area crisis, management of official loan maturities emerged as a critical item in the discussion on which instruments and strategies are most effective at ensuring debt sustainability. Using a theoretical model calibrated to Portugal and cross-country data, this column shows that lengthening loan maturities and managing debt repayment flows has substantial effects on sustainability. It also unveils a key policy trade-off in official lending between increasing the amount of safe debt (immune from rollover risk) and strengthening the incentive to default in response to negative shocks to fundamentals.

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