EU policies

Holger Breinlich, Dennis Novy, 16 August 2019

As Brexit nears (again), are British firms choosing to invest in the UK or in other European markets? Are European firms investing in the UK to preserve access to its markets? And has "global Britain" got off the drawing board yet? Holger Breinlich and Dennis Novy lead Tim Phillips through the numbers.

San Bilal, Bernard Hoekman, 31 July 2019

In today’s rapidly evolving and uncertain trade context, the EU has to reposition itself, adapting its trade and external policies to better pursue its economic interests, but also to achieve its political, geostrategic, developmental, environmental, and principles-based objectives. This column introduces a new eBook that brings together perspectives on such questions as whether the EU has been effective in its pursuit of non-trade policy objectives relating to standards, values, sustainability and development, and if so, whether this has been at the expense of more traditional trade policy objectives.

Konstantinos Efstathiou, Guntram Wolff, 17 July 2019

In 2011, the EU introduced stricter rules to monitor the implementation of country-specific policy recommendations. Using a new dataset, this column investigates whether these new laws have increased national compliance. There is no evidence that these stricter processes matter for implementation rates, whereas macroeconomic fundamentals and market pressure are important determinants of implementation progress. These results suggest ways to improve the effectiveness of European policy coordination that go beyond stronger legal processes.

Nauro Campos, Fabrizio Coricelli, 08 July 2019

This year has seen the 20th anniversary of the euro, but so far we have not seen many articles that take stock of the accomplishments and disillusionments of the single currency, and of how to improve it. This column hopes to change this by picking and discussing 20 papers that economists and policymakers should read, or re-read, and reflect upon in this 20th anniversary year.

Bo Becker, 27 June 2019

A new EU directive proposes important reforms to member countries’ corporate insolvency processes. This column argues that the directive is a step in the right direction but that it has crucial flaws in the way it envisions restructuring and priority of creditors. It also proposes a system – comparable to the US approach – in which restructuring and liquidation are alternative options triggered by insolvency, and that respects the absolute priority of creditors. 

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