Financial regulation and banking

Erik Feyen, Jon Frost, Harish Natarajan, 16 January 2020

Proposals for global stablecoins have put a welcome spotlight on deficiencies in financial inclusion and cross-border payments and remittances to emerging market and developing economies. This column, part of the Vox debate on digital currencies, argues however that stablecoin initiatives are no panacea. Moreover, they pose particular development, macroeconomic and cross-border challenges for emerging market and developing economies. It remains to be seen whether stablecoins can offer a decisive comparative advantage over fast-moving fintech innovations in these countries that are built on or improve the existing financial plumbing.

Markus K Brunnermeier, Jean-Pierre Landau, 15 January 2020

Central banks have been called on to contribute to fighting climate change. This column presents a framework for thinking about the issue and identifies some major trade-offs and choices. It argues that climate should be a major part of risk assessments and that capital ratios could be used in a proactive way by applying favourable regimes to ‘green’ loans and investments. It also suggests that central banks may want to take several climate change-related aspects into account when designing and implementing monetary policies. However, the central bank should retain absolute discretion to interrupt any action if its first-priority objective – price stability – were to be compromised.

Steven Ongena, Raphael Auer, 14 January 2020

Targeted macroprudential policies may spill across sectors, but this does not mean that they are ineffective. This column shows how the effects of a countercyclical capital buffer designed to curb house price growth in Switzerland spilled over into commercial lending. But a model that matches the uncovered spillovers in volumes and interest rates shows that they by no means undermine the rationale for focusing policy measures on specific sectors. On the contrary, it suggests that regulators can avail themselves of this new tool to increase the overall resilience of banks

Iain Begg, David Miles, 10 January 2020

In 2020, the UK and the EU will try to strike a post-Brexit deal in financial services. At the SEURF conference in Amsterdam, David Miles and Iain Begg explain to Tim Phillips what's at stake in the negotiations, and who would suffer most if there's no deal.

Orkun Saka, 06 January 2020

European banks have been criticised for holding too much domestic government debt during the recent euro area crisis, intensifying the doom loop between sovereign and bank credit risks. This column deviates from previous research that focused on 'bad' reasons for holding sovereign debt, and points to a 'good' reason: an informational advantage that particular banks have regarding sovereigns. This seems to have had a role in the fragmentation of European government bond markets. 

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