Frontiers of economic research

Gianni De Fraja, 23 August 2019

How would units of assessment submitted to the UK’s 2014 evaluation of scholarly research have fared if they had had been assessed using the bibliometric algorithm of the agency for evaluation of research in Italian universities? This column finds very high correlation between the two methods. In particular, the allocation of government funding to institutions that would have been obtained is essentially identical to that determined by the rules used by the REF2014.

Rabah Arezki, 19 August 2019

Algeria’s recent victory in the Africa Cup of Nations has united a country whose development model has frustrated its young and educated workforce. This column offers four lessons for economic development from the national football team’s success: on the role of competition and market forces, mobilising talent, the role of managers, and the importance of referees (i.e. regulation). 

Jon Danielsson, Robert Macrae, 12 August 2019

The type of risk we most care about is long-term, what happens over years or decades, but we tend to manage that risk over short periods. This column argues that the dissonance of risk is that we measure and manage what we don't care about and ignore what we do.

Theresa Kuchler, Johannes Stroebel, 09 August 2019

The mixing of people and ideas in cities is at the heart of the ‘agglomeration externalities’ that drive the high productivity of cities. While public transit infrastructure is thought to help different people living in different parts of the same city to interact with one another, the lack of large-scale data has made it difficult to study. This column explores the link between public transit and social connectedness in New York City. It finds the first suggestive evidence that New York City’s public transit system plays an important role in enabling social ties to be formed and maintained across geographic distances.

Peter Schwardmann, 02 August 2019

Despite all the evidence to the contrary we continue to overestimate how much work we will do tomorrow, or how often we will go to the gym. Why? Peter Schwardmann tells Tim Phillips that we do learn from experience about ourselves - in the right circumstances.

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