Frontiers of economic research

Claudia Biancotti, Paolo Ciocca, 23 October 2018

Calls for regulation of big tech are getting louder and louder. This column argues that policy proposals should be evaluated through the lens of their impact on the evolution of artificial intelligence. It proposes a holistic framework that encompasses consumer control over data, competition in product markets, incentives to innovation, and implications for international trade. It also highlights the role played by major big tech companies, and the threat of data and artificial intelligence monopolisation.

Kenneth Gillingham, 19 October 2018

William Nordhaus of Yale University has been jointly awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences with Paul Romer for ‘integrating climate change into long-run macroeconomic analysis’. This column, written by a co-author and Yale colleague, outlines how his contributions have broadened the scope of economic analysis, shedding light on the causes and consequences of the unintended effects of human activity on the long-run trajectory of economic growth and wellbeing.

Mikael Homanen, 15 October 2018

Bank creditors have non-financial preferences too, and may withdraw deposits as a form of discipline. This column shows that protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline that targeted investor banks caused significant decreases in deposit growth, and global data suggest that this type of reaction to bank-specific scandals is widespread.

Chad Jones, 12 October 2018

Paul Romer of New York University has been jointly awarded the 2018 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences with William Nordhaus ‘for integrating technological innovations into long-run macroeconomic analysis’. This column explains his key insights and their wide-ranging implications for our understanding of the process of economic growth.

Katre Eljas-Taal, Neil Kay, Lucas Porsch, Katarina Svatikova, 12 October 2018

Collaborative platforms have quickly penetrated several services sectors. Statistics on the development of the collaborative economy are essential for appropriate policy responses but there are few available. This column presents a simple methodology for estimating the economic size of the collaborative economy, which is also relevant for the platform economy.

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