Global crisis

Marco Buti, 12 January 2020

In December 2019, Marco Buti left the position of Director General for Economic and Financial Affairs at the European Commission at the end of a rough journey through the crisis and its aftermath. In this column, he draws the main lessons out of five key moments in the crisis for the completion of EMU and the appropriate policy mix in the euro area.

Patrick Augustin, Mikhail Chernov, Lukas Schmid, Dongho Song, 10 January 2020

Benchmark interest rates, such as LIBOR or EFFR, not only serve as indicators of the monetary policy stance but also as reference rates for the multi-trillion interest rate derivatives and mortgage markets. Since the Global Crisis, these interest rates have followed a puzzling pattern relative to the US Treasury yields, known as negative swap rates. This column describes the pattern, explains why it is puzzling, and argues that the emergence of US default risk can naturally explain negative swap spreads. 

Tsutomu Miyagawa, Takayuki Ishikawa, 13 November 2019

Following the Global Crisis, some countries increased expenditures on research and development (R&D) to address secular stagnation. This column investigates how successful this rise in R&D scale was in supporting productivity growth in Japan and other advanced economies. It argues that R&D efficiency has declined in many of these countries in the past decade, compared to the preceding ten years. This suggests that increasing R&D spending is not enough to foster growth, and that countries need to do more to support innovation and collaboration in carefully chosen sectors.

Thorsten Beck, Consuelo Silva-Buston, Wolf Wagner, 04 September 2019

Following the Global Crisis, countries have significantly increased their efforts to cooperate on bank supervision, the prime example being the euro area’s Single Supervisory Mechanism. However, little is known about whether such cooperation helps improve the stability of the financial system. Using panel data for a large sample of cross-border banks, this column examines whether a higher incidence of supervisory cooperation is associated with higher bank stability. It finds that supervisory cooperation is effective, working through asset risk, but not for very large banks, which are the ones that pose the highest risk to financial stability.

Jean-Charles Bricongne, Alessandro Turrini, 21 August 2019

The increased post-Global Crisis monitoring of house prices still lacks an effective measure for cross-country comparisons. This column outlines the creation of an integrated database covering advanced and emerging economies on the price per square metre of housing. The model shows that price-to-income ratios vary substantially at the extremes, but that the majority economies converge around the median level. Country rankings based on housing prices in euros versus PPP also vary significantly.

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