Global economy

Thorsten Beck, Emily Jones , Peter Knaack, 14 October 2018

In today’s world of globalised finance, regulators in developing countries have to weigh up the international ramifications of their decisions. This column presents the results of a research project which combines cross-country panel analysis and in-depth case studies of the political economy of the adoption of Basel II/III in the developing world. It finds that regulators in developing countries do not merely adopt Basel II/III because these standards provide the optimal technical solution to financial stability risks in their jurisdictions; concerns about reputation and competition are also important. 

Saleem Bahaj, Ricardo Reis, 25 September 2018

Swap lines between advanced economy central banks are a new and important part of the global financial architecture. This column analyses their role, from the perspective of central banks, in the transmission of monetary policy, and in the macroeconomic effects of policy. Results show that swap lines serve as liquidity facilities, that they put a ceiling on deviations from covered interest parity, and that they incentivise cross-border gross capital flows. 

José De Gregorio, Barry Eichengreen, Takatoshi Ito, Charles Wyplosz, 11 September 2018

Two decades ago the four authors of the CEPR's first Geneva Report on the World Economy examined the future of the IMF. This year, for the 20th report, they returned to see what progress has been made. Tim Phillips talks to Barry Eichengreen, Charles Wyplosz, José De Gregorio, and Takatoshi Ito about how the IMF has evolved, and the threats both to the IMF and the entire multilateral financial system.

Agnès Bénassy-Quéré, Matthieu Bussière, Pauline Wibaux, 16 August 2018

Recent events on the international stage have reignited the debate on trade and currency wars. This column compares two forms of non-cooperative policies – import tariffs and currency devaluations – within a single framework. The results show that tariffs and devaluations do not have equivalent effects on trade flows. A 1% depreciation of the importer's currency reduces imports by around 0.5% in current dollars, whereas an increase in import tariffs by 1 percentage point reduces imports by around 1.4%.

Marco Buti, Mirco Tomasi, 20 July 2018

International economic cooperation is in crisis. The global economy faces fragmentation across institutional, economic, and social dimensions. This column argues that the task of the G20 is to revamp international economic cooperation and to promote a multilateral approach that addresses the key concerns of our citizens starting with greater inclusiveness and fairness. Europe can play a leading role in a world in search of a new anchor. 

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