Health economics

Thomas Longden, 09 September 2018

During the last 15 years, various regions around the world have been struck by some very strong heatwaves. This column uses examples of heatwaves in Australia to argue that a lack of acclimatisation is a key factor that influences how deadly these extreme temperature events are, and identifies thresholds for hotter temperatures that capture the temperature-related mortality relationship for such events. 

Panle Jia Barwick, Shanjun Li, Deyu Rao, Nahim Bin Zahur, 04 September 2018

Air pollution is a serious concern for China. National levels of fine particular matter are well above recommended standards, and the average concentration across China’s thirteen largest cities is 30% higher than the national average. This column examines the relationship between health spending in China and air pollution, showing that health spending increases significantly during the two months following exposure to air pollution. A reduction of fine particular matter by about 20% from the current level could result in annual savings of 60 billion yuan in healthcare expenditure.

Ralph Koijen, 17 August 2018

New drugs mean that many types of cancer are no longer a death sentence. But new medical treatments may have a catastrophic financial cost for patients. Tim Phillips talks to Ralph Koijen about how life insurance, not medical insurance, might finance the war on cancer.

Janet Currie, Hannes Schwandt, Josselin Thuilliez, 10 August 2018

Understanding how inequalities in health are related to inequalities in income is a key issue for policymakers. This column describes how despite increasing income inequality in both countries, the development of mortality has been very different in France compared with the US. The findings show that inequalities in income and health do not necessarily move in tandem, and highlight how public policy helps to break this link. 

Jonathan Gruber, Thomas Hoe, George Stoye, 04 August 2018

Emergency departments in hospitals around the world are under pressure to reduce waiting times. This column analyses the effect of a government target for hospitals in England which mandates a maximum waiting time of four hours. The target successfully reduced waiting times and mortality, but increased costs per patient.

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