Institutions and economics

Gordon Dahl, 30 November 2018

We are sending more people to prison than ever. But we know surprisingly little about whether, and how, prison sentences cut crime. Gordon Dahl of USC San Diego tells Tim Phillips about new research that shows how prison sentences can work for both inmates and society.

Arthur Dyevre, Monika Glavina, Nicolas Lampach, Michal Ovádek, Wessel Wijtvliet, 22 November 2018

Twenty-eight months after the Brexit referendum, EU laws, regulations, and doctrines continue to apply to UK residents and state officials. This column shows that UK judges and litigants have already started to move away from EU law in anticipation of Brexit, with judges submitting 22–23% fewer questions to the European Court of Justice since the referendum. The broader lesson for the future of supranational legal systems is that effective disintegration may precede formal withdrawal, or may occur even if formal withdrawal is delayed or does not come about.

José De Gregorio, Barry Eichengreen, Takatoshi Ito, Charles Wyplosz, 11 September 2018

Twenty years ago, ICMB and CEPR published the first Geneva Report on the World Economy. Over these last two decades, the world of international finance has changed and so too has the IMF. This column introduces the latest report, in which the same team of authors highlight seven key developments affecting the monetary and financial environment and their implications for the Fund. 

Ravi Kanbur, 09 March 2018

Gunnar Myrdal’s “Asian Drama” was published 50 years ago. On the face of it, the book, framed in terms of the realities of an economically stagnant Asia, appears to have little to offer the modern development economist. This column argues, however, that the issues Myrdal raised are fundamental ones not only for development but for our discipline of economics and for the broader terrain of political economy.

Jonathan D. Ostry, Andrew Berg, Siddharth Kothari, 19 February 2018

While there is consensus that structural reforms can increase growth, there is also a fear that certain reforms can exacerbate inequality. This column argues – based on a dataset covering financial, institutional, and real sector reforms – that certain reforms do indeed increase inequality but despite this, the net effect on growth remains positive.

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