International finance

Yossi Saadon, Nathan Sussman, 31 October 2018

Global integration has increased rapidly over recent decades, leaving basic theories of exchange rate equilibrium ripe for reconsideration. This column tests two such theories – purchasing power parity and uncovered interest rate parity – using the case of the advanced, small open economy of Israel and the US. The results show that when the necessary conditions are met, the purchasing power parity and uncovered interest rate parity relationships continue to hold in the short run. 

Anna Cieslak, Andreas Schrimpf, 22 October 2018

Central bank communication affects asset prices and therefore the broader economy, but the channels through which this happens are not clear. The column proposes a novel approach to distinguishing the types of news. In more than half of communication events, the non-monetary component dominates the market reaction to central bank communication.

Signe Krogstrup, Cédric Tille, 29 August 2018

Volatility in international capital flows can disrupt international trade and finance. This column explores the role of agents’ exposure to risk in this dynamic, focusing on domestic financial firms. It finds that the impact of an increase in risk aversion on foreign currency funding is conditional on the bank’s initial net currency exposure. This suggests that the empirical link from global factors to cross-border bank funding depends on country-specific characteristics of financial institutions.

Matteo Maggiori, Brent Neiman, Jesse Schreger, 18 June 2018

Currency is a far more important factor for cross-border capital flows than is typically assumed. This column demonstrates that investors exhibit a strong bias toward securities denominated in their home currency even when investing in bonds issued by developed countries, implying that the majority of foreign firms that do not issue foreign currency bonds typically do not borrow from abroad directly. A key exception to this pattern is the US, as the global taste for dollars enables smaller firms that issue only dollar-denominated bonds to access foreign capital. The benefit that the dollar’s status offers the US appears to have increased since the Global Crisis at the expense of the euro.

Jeromin Zettelmeyer, Álvaro Leandro, 01 June 2018

The euro area lacks a common safe asset, leaving banks to rely on bonds issued by their own countries and thus magnifying fiscal crises and contributing to financial fragmentation. To address this problem, an influential proposal advocates sovereign-bond backed securities, the most senior of which would play the role of safe asset. This column, which introduces a new CEPR Policy Insight, investigates whether criticism of the proposal’s reliance on securitisation is justified and compares it with alternatives that would not require tranching.

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