Migration

Giovanni Facchini, Timothy Hatton, Max Steinhardt, 18 December 2021

The 1965 Immigration Act represented a radical shift in US policy, dramatically expanding the volume and changing the composition of immigration. Its approval has often been described as the result of political machinations negotiated within Congress, without regard to public opinion. This column shows instead that congressional voting was consistent with public opinion on abolishing the country-of-origin quotas but not with the desire to limit the volume of immigration.   

Orsetta Causa, Maria Chiara Cavalleri, Michael Abendschein, Nhung Luu, 11 December 2021

The capacity of workers to move regions in response to local economic shocks is a key dimension of labour market dynamism that could contribute to recovery from the COVID-19 crisis and support the green transition. This column presents new empirical evidence on how policies can shape the responsiveness of inter-regional migration to regional economic conditions, with a particular focus on housing markets, social policies, and business regulations. It highlights the need for articulating place-based policies to help prospective movers as well as stayers.

Timothy Hatton, 19 November 2021

Less than half of all applicants for political asylum in Europe gain some form of recognition that allows them to stay. Since the early 2000s, the EU has developed a common asylum policy with the aims of protecting the rights of refugees and mitigating the ‘asylum lottery’.  This column shows that the implementation of EU Directives contributed modestly to an overall increase in average recognition rates but has not reduced the variation in rates across countries.

Raphaël Parchet, Frédéric Robert-Nicoud, 15 October 2021

The development of the Swiss highway network from 1960 to 2010 influenced the residential and job compositions of municipalities. The advent of an entrance/exit ramp within 10 km of a municipality caused a long-term 24% increase in the share of top-income taxpayers. The welfare gains of residents of connected municipalities relative to residents in non-connected municipalities range from only 2% for the low-income group to 12% for the top-income group. Highways also contributed to job and residential urban sprawl.

Mark Taylor, 05 September 2021

The late 19th-century decline in British agricultural prices shrank the incomes of aristocrats and of land-owning ‘commoners’ as well. To carry on the tradition of raising money through auspicious marriages, British aristocrats looked across the Atlantic – to US heiresses with large dowries but no pedigrees, even by the standards of their own country. This column examines the social and economic forces that steered the daughters of US business magnates into marriages with British aristocrats. 

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