Monetary policy

Paul Krugman, 12 April 2021

Nobel Laureate Robert Mundell passed away on 4 April 2021. In this column, Paul Krugman describes the evolution of Mundell’s contribution to economic thought and policy, from his early pathbreaking models that remain the foundation of modern international macroeconomics to his later views that were more controversial and less influential in the profession. He also offers an explanation of how the man who brought Keynesian analysis to the open economy and highlighted the difficult tradeoffs in creating a currency area could come to be seen as the father of both supply-side economics and the euro.

Sebastian Edwards, Luis Cabezas, 08 April 2021

The nominal exchange rate plays a dual role in macroeconomic adjustments – it is part of the transmission mechanism of monetary policy, and it also helps accommodate external and domestic shocks through its effect on the real exchange rate. This column uses disaggregated price index data from Iceland to test how exchange rate pass-through varies with the international tradability of goods and with the monetary policy framework. It shows that pass-through is significantly higher for tradables relative to nontradables. In addition, it finds that improvements in the credibility of the central bank are associated with declines in the exchange rate pass-through. 

Joshua Aizenman, Hiro Ito, Gurnain Kaur Pasricha, 08 April 2021

Facing acute strains in the offshore dollar funding markets during Covid-19, the Federal Reserve implemented measures to provide US dollar liquidity. This column examines how the Fed reinforced swap arrangements and established a ‘financial institutions and monetary authorities’ repo facility in response to the crisis. Closer pre-existing ties with the US helped economies access the liquidity arrangements. Further, the announcements of the liquidity expansion facilities led to appreciation of partner currencies against the dollar, as did US dollar auctions by foreign central banks. 

Yasin Mimir, Enes Sunel, 05 April 2021

Central banks in emerging economies deployed asset purchases for the first time to respond to the Covid-19 shock. Initial studies have found quantitative easing reduced long-term bond yields in these economies without creating bouts of currency depreciation. This column argues that asset purchases ease financial conditions in emerging economies by curbing capital outflows enabled by stronger bank balance sheets upon the asset intermediation by the central bank. If asset purchases cause a de-anchoring in inflation expectations, their effectiveness diminishes. Counterfactual policy experiments reveal that bond yield reductions from asset purchases during the pandemic could have persisted only under large-sized programmes that are representative of advanced economies.

Jon Danielsson, 26 March 2021

What would the world look like if Bitcoin completely displaced fiat currency? Jon Danielsson tells Tim Phillips that it wouldn't be a society that he would like to live in. 

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