Vox Talks

Kathryn Judge, Anil Kashyap, 17 September 2021

In March 2020 we all assumed there would be some reaction to Covid-19 on Wall Street but, when markets did the opposite of what most people expected, the Fed had to step in to stabilise the economy. Anil Kashyap and Kathryn Judge tell Tim Phillips what happened, why, and how to stop it happening again.

Read more about the research behind this: VoxColumn: Reforming the macroprudential regulatory architecture in the US, Kathryn Judge, Anil Kashyap

Earlier in 2021 Peter Neary passed away. This special episode pays tribute to his work and examines why Peter was held in such affection by his colleagues. With contributions from Patrick Honohan, Richard Portes, Monika Mrázová, Beata Javorcik, and Abi Adams-Prassl.

Mehdi Benatiya Andaloussi, 02 September 2021

How many lives could be saved if rich countries shared their vaccines? Less than 2% of people in low-income countries have received even one dose. Mehdi Benatiya Andaloussi tells Tim Phillips about his calculation of how many lives would be saved by the end of 2021 if vaccines were shared more fairly - and how many have been lost because this hasn't happened so far.

Read more about the research discussed and download the free discussion paper:
Benatiya Andaloussi, M and Spilimbergo, A. 2021. 'How many lives could be saved through the early sharing of vaccines globally?' CEPR

Eric Schneider, 27 August 2021

The records of London's Foundling Hospital provide centuries of information on children's health. Eric Schneider tells Tim Phillips how he used this data to discover surprising information about the link between nutrition and common childhood illnesses.

Read more about the research behind this Vox Talk:

Schneider, E. 2021. 'The Effect of Nutritional Status on Historical Infectious Disease Morbidity: Evidence from the London Foundling Hospital, 1892-1919'. CEPR

Hans-Joachim Voth, 20 August 2021

In 1932, Hitler and his followers believed that marching through the streets in uniform would convince the German public to vote them into power. But did the flags, songs and stomping boots actually persuade people? Hans-Joachim Voth tells Tim Phillips how polling data (and the spread of a pandemic) reveal whether this type of propaganda actually worked.

Read more about the research behind this Vox Talk:

Caesmann, M, Caprettini, B, Voth, H and Yanagizawa-Drott, D. 2021. 'Going Viral: Propaganda, Persuasion and Polarization in 1932 Hamburg'. CEPR

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