Alessandro Antimiani, Lucian Cernat, 24 June 2021

Many believe that the global trading system could offer little more to least developed countries beyond the various unilateral preferential schemes currently in place. This column argues that there is room for new multilateral initiatives to strengthen the participation of these countries in global value chains. It advocates for a new ‘GVCs for LDCs’ global preferential scheme based on least developed countries’ value added, thereby covering exports by these countries along the entire supply chain. Estimates suggest that such a scheme would increase global trade, improve least developed countries’ value added, and promote further value chain integration between these and other developing countries.

Michal Gradzewicz, Jakub Mućk, 17 September 2020

There has been a lively debate concerning the dynamics of markups. This column contributes to this debate by studying the relationship between globalisation and monopolistic markups in Poland. It highlights important non-linearities leading to an uneven  distribution of the effects of global value chains for participating firms, with lowest benefits found for firms in the middle of the production chain where goods are highly standardised and substitutable. It also documents a fall in markups for Poland which can be explained by rising dependence on imported intermediates in export-oriented production and fiercer competition of domestic firms on export markets.

James Zhan, Richard Bolwijn, Bruno Casella, Amelia U. Santos-Paulino, 13 August 2020

Global value chains will undergo a drastic transformation in the decade ahead. The change will be driven by a push for greater supply chain resilience due to COVID-19, which adds to existing pressures from the technology revolution, growing economic nationalism, and the sustainability imperative. Based on UNCTAD’s World Investment Report 2020, this column argues that the global trade and investment landscape will be reshaped by the restructuring of global chains, build-up of new regional chains, and distributed manufacturing. While these will present daunting challenges, they will also offer ample opportunities for firms and states alike and will lead to a GVC-development paradigm shift.

Jan Hagemejer, Jakub Mućk, 29 May 2019

Fragmentation of production has made it difficult to assess the contribution of exports to economic growth. This column decomposes growth into value added absorbed at home and that exported. Empirical results show that economic growth in Central and East European countries after 1995 was mainly driven by exports. The pace of convergence in Europe for exported value added was around four times faster than for domestic value added.

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