Debin Ma, 04 June 2019

Over the last four decades, China’s economy grew at an astonishing pace while remaining firmly in the grip of an authoritarian political regime, thereby upending long-settled economic models. But an earlier era in Chinese history tells a different story. This column examines the period from 1900 to 1937, when rules governing the treaty port of Shanghai attracted major Western banks (and sheltered the Bank of China’s Shanghai branch) by curbing or side-stepping state power. This is a rare glimpse into a period of Chinese history in which financial practices were largely freed from the constraints of authoritarian rule. 

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