Avinash Persaud, 23 February 2021

The switch to renewable energies is necessary for humanity’s future, but it is currently too slow. For developing countries, the critical obstacle is the pricing, ownership, land-use and approval processes renewable projects have to go through. This column argues that to bring dividends for sunnier, developing countries, provide more projects for green investors, and for some redemption for the rest of humanity, countries should (1) streamline the approval process, (2) broaden the ownership of assets through mandated initial public offerings and small-investor allocations while supporting big foreign investors in the short-run, and (3) offer an attractive feed-in tariff that predictably ratchets down in favour of consumers once investors reach their return threshold.

Mark Hoekstra, Jonathan Meer, Steve Puller, Jeremy West, 15 July 2015

A primary policy tool for reducing pollution from motor vehicles in the US is to directly regulate fuel efficiency. This column investigates whether drivers respond to increased fuel efficiency standards by driving more. The evidence from a stimulus programme shows that households did not increase their driving due to increased fuel efficiency regulations, but they purchased smaller, cheaper, and less powerful vehicles.

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CEPR Policy Research