Oliver de Groot, Alexander Haas, 16 June 2020

The magnitude of the COVID-induced economic downturn is forcing central banks around the world to rethink the set of monetary policy tools available to them. Many central banks have long shied away from negative interest rates, concerned about the impact on bank profits and financial stability. This column explores how negative interest rate policies can be used by central banks to signal a commitment to a prolonged period of monetary accommodation. Using a quantitative monetary model, it shows that the signalling channel of negative interest rates can result in a rise in banks’ net worth even if net interest margins shrink.

Carlo Altavilla, Lorenzo Burlon, Mariassunta Giannetti, Sarah Holton, 08 November 2019

Economists and policymakers continue to question the effectiveness of monetary policy when an economy faces near-zero or sub-zero interest rates. Sceptics argue that central banks cannot stimulate lending, and may indeed decrease the loan supply, by setting negative interest rates. This column shows that negative rates do not impede the transmission of monetary policy from banks to deposit holders because firms do not withdraw cash in response to negative rates the way households might. In fact, sub-zero rates may even stimulate the economy by encouraging firms to invest.

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