Vyacheslav Fos, Naser Hamdi, Ankit Kalda, Jordan Nickerson, 29 March 2020

The growth of the gig economy has renewed debates about how to regulate employers who provide neither health insurance nor social security benefits to their employees. Using a combination of Uber product launch dates and employee-level data on job separations, this column finds that employees who are laid off from their formal occupations but have access to Uber are less likely to rely on unemployment insurance. Instead, gig labour provides a safety net as they search for more permanent work in the formal market.

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