Anna Stansbury, Lawrence H. Summers, 02 June 2020

Since the early 1980s, the US has seen a falling labour share and slow wage growth for typical workers, while measures of corporate valuations and measured markups have increased. A number of papers have argued that increasing monopoly or monopsony power can explain these trends. This column argues instead that the decline in worker power in the US economy is a more compelling explanation for recent macro trends than a broad-based rise in monopoly power.

Jesús Fernández-Villaverde, Daniel Sanches, Linda Schilling, Harald Uhlig, 25 April 2020

The possibility and logistics of developing a central bank digital currency for the general public has attracted significant attention. Such an initiative would require central banks to be involved in financial intermediation and maturity transformation. This column explores the implications of such a venture by central banks using a classic banking model. With sufficient competition, a central bank digital currency can be beneficial and achieve the optimal allocation of funds. However, it also risks giving central banks excessive monopoly power, which could result in inferior outcomes.

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