Olivier Sterck, Max Roser, Mthuli Ncube, Stefan Thewissen, 16 February 2018

Large multilateral organisations like WHO and the UN rely heavily on average income data in determining eligibility for, and the allocation of, development assistance for health. This column tests this paradigm by analysing the determinants of health outcomes for 99 countries. A country’s epidemiological surroundings, poverty gap, and institutional capacity appear to be much better predictors of health outcomes than gross national income. These findings suggest alternative metrics that could be leveraged in allocating development assistance for health.

Ravi Kanbur, Andy Sumner, 08 November 2011

Many poor people no longer live in poor countries. Of the 10 countries that contribute most to global poverty, six are middle-income countries. For many aid organisations, ‘middle-income’ means they no longer qualify for the same financial aid. This column argues that such a policy would be failing up to a billion people.

Helmut Reisen, 13 August 2008

Many development organisations are working on the Millennium Development Goals, but will any of them be held accountable when the targets are not met? This column introduces the importance of mapping the “global development finance non-system” in order to identify agencies’ overlap, activity duplication, and mission creep. International reform will be mammoth task.

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