Alexander Cappelen, Bertil Tungodden, 26 May 2016

What happens in the brain when something is fair or unfair? In this video, Alexander Cappelen and Bertil Tungodden present their research on the effects of fairness on our brains. Using fMRI technology, the neuroeconomics study shows that the brain reacts to unfairness. Income inequalities are perceived as fair if they reflect different work contributions. This video was recorded at the Choice Lab, Norwegian School of Economics, in Bergen.

Juan Carrillo, Isabelle Brocas, 18 March 2010

Why do people persistently make seemingly irrational decisions? This column introduces neuroeconomic theory, which uses neuroscience and neurobiology to try to shed light on the black box of human decision-making.

Mirre Stallen, Richard Ridderinkhof, Frans van Winden, 13 October 2008

Ethnically diverse groups are less successful in providing public goods. This column suggests that affective interpersonal relationships may be a critical component in cooperative behaviour and outlines the evidence – from brain scans to experimental games – of their importance.

Colin Camerer, 29 August 2008

Colin Camerer of Caltech talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about his research programme on ‘neuroeconomics’ – the creation and use of data on brain processes to suggest new underpinnings for economic theories, which explain how much people save, why there are strikes, why the stock market fluctuates, the nature of consumer confidence and its effect on the economy, and so on. The interview was recorded at the American Economic Association meetings in New Orleans in January 2008.

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