Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan, 04 January 2022

What were the effects of fiscal policy in response to the COVID-19 pandemic at the firm, sector, country and global level, and how efficient was it?

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Gourinchas, P, Kalemli-Ozcan, S, Penciakova, V and Sander, N. 2021. 'Fiscal Policy in the Age of COVID: Does it 'Get in all of the Cracks?'' CEPR

Ilan Goldfajn, Eduardo Levy Yeyati, 20 December 2021

The impact of the Covid-19 pandemic in Latin America highlighted the challenge of long-standing fiscal and social deficits in a context of overstretched public sector resources. And it deepened a growing discontent with the economic status quo and the political system. A new CEPR eBook collects a series of conversations with distinguished Latin American researchers and policymakers aimed at trying to map a possible future for Latin America, with a focus on avoiding the next crisis, policies for sustainable growth, social challenges, and the future of democracy.  

Janine Aron, John Muellbauer, 29 September 2020

The US has 4% of the world’s population but 21% of the global COVID-19-attributed infections and deaths. This column shows that when comparing excess mortality rates, a more robust way of reporting on pandemic deaths, Europe’s cumulative excess mortality rate from March to July is 28% lower than the US rate, contradicting the Trump administration’s claim that Europe’s rate is 33% higher. The US Northeast – the region most comparable with individual European countries – has experienced substantially worse excess mortality than Europe’s worst-affected countries. Had the US kept its excess mortality rate down to the level in Europe, around 57,800 American lives would have been saved. 

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