Vu Minh Ngo, Klaus F. Zimmermann, Phuc V. Nguyen, Toan L.D. Huynh, Huan Huu Nguyen, 25 January 2022

Because vaccinations are crucial to containing the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important to identify the key factors behind successful immunisation campaigns. This column shows that pandemic pressures, economic strength, educational advancement, and political regimes can affect vaccination uptake, given vaccine availability. While democratic regimes initially show faster vaccination uptake, this advantage fades out as countries try to get more people vaccinated. Countries with strong economies and education systems are likely to have faster uptake of vaccination campaigns.

Shusaku Sasaki, Tomoya Saito, Fumio Ohtake, 13 December 2021

Vaccination promotion is crucial to ending the Covid-19 pandemic. This column reports on an experiment in Japan examining whether people altered their vaccination intentions based on information about how their decision could affect vaccine uptake by others. Hearing that getting vaccinated could encourage uptake by others around them increased the proportion of older adults who would receive the vaccine if offered for free, while hearing that not getting vaccinated may discourage uptake by others strengthened the intention to get vaccinated among older adults who had already indicated their willingness to be vaccinated. Finally, hearing how likely others of a similar age were to get vaccinated also strengthened existing intentions – whether pro- or anti-vaccination. The ‘nudges’ did not appear to have an effect on younger adults. 

Maarten Verwey, Milan Vyskrabka, Philipp Pfeiffer, 15 February 2021

The breakthroughs in vaccine development in the autumn of 2020 and the start of mass vaccination campaigns in 2021 brightened the near-term outlook for the EU economy. However, hopes of a quick recovery have, to some extent, been overshadowed by the recent resurgence of the pandemic. In order to highlight the extent of prevailing uncertainty and the importance of vaccinations for EU’s economic trajectory, this column describes the optimistic and pessimistic model-based scenarios for the EU economy forecast by the European Commission. It finds that effective vaccines and their quick roll-out could add about three percentage points to annual growth of EU this year. 

Sandy Tubeuf, 02 December 2020

Once a safe COVID-19 vaccine will become available, there will not be enough supply of it to vaccinate the entire population. Policy makers at national and international level are currently developing vaccine prioritization strategies. However, it is important that these strategies have sufficient levels of public support. Sandy Tubeuf (UC Louvain) discusses her work on how people perceive priority cases for vaccination. Read the Covid Economics paper behind this discussion: Who should get it first? Public preferences for distributing a COVID-19 vaccine by Jeroen Luyten, Sandy Tubeuf , Roselinde Kessels 

Miquel Oliu-Barton, Bary Pradelski, 02 October 2020

With coronavirus vaccines potentially on the horizon, attention is now turning to how to distribute them once they are available. This column makes the case for vaccination deployment being dependent on the prevalence of the virus in a zone (i.e. a predefined geographical area). Red zones should focus on vaccinating people at risk and health workers to reduce fatalities and keep hospitals operational. Green zones, where community transmission is low, should additionally focus on vaccinating inter-zone travellers and highly central individuals to reduce the risk of re-importation and keep virus spread near zero. 

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