Kacie Dragan, Ingrid Gould Ellen, Sherry Glied, 19 September 2019

The pace of gentrification in US cities has accelerated, but little evidence exists on its impact on low-income children. This column uses Medicaid claims data to examine how gentrification affects children’s health and wellbeing in New York City. It finds that low-income children born in areas that gentrify are no more likely to move than those born in areas that don't gentrify, and those that do move tend to end up living in areas of lower poverty. Moreover, gentrification does not appear to dramatically alter the health status or health-system utilisation of children by age 9–11, although children growing up in gentrifying areas show somewhat elevated levels of anxiety and depression.

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The scope of the event is to give participants the opportunity to present their work in progress to an audience of peers with homogeneous research interests and get valuable feedback to improve their ongoing research.

This year the event will be held in two different venues according to the following schedule:

Corte, Corse May 30th- June 2nd

Urban and regional economics and policy (May 30th-31st)
Economics of risky behavior (June 1st-2nd)

Alghero, Sardinia June 19th-22nd

Political economy (June 19th-20th), keynote speaker: James Fearon, Stanford University
Credit and financial frictions (June 19th-20th), keynote speaker: TBA
Health economics (June 21st-22nd), keynote speaker: Christopher Carpenter, Vanderbilt University
Media economics (June 21st-22nd), keynote speaker: Hal Varian, Google Inc.

The deadline for the application is 15th March 2018.

Gabriel Ahlfeldt, Daniel McMillen, 04 November 2017

Cities around the world are experiencing unprecedented vertical growth, but there has been little study of the economics of tall buildings. This column summarises novel evidence on the determinants of the urban height profile and the cost of building tall, and derives implications for urban theory and policy. In contrast to standard urban economics models, there is a role for the supply side in determining horizontal land use patterns. Vertical expansion is unlikely to resolve affordability problems in growing cities.

Trevon Logan, John Parman, 09 March 2015

Racial disparities in socioeconomic conditions remain a major policy issue throughout the world. This column applies a new neighbour-based measure of residential segregation to US census data from 1880 and 1940. The authors find that existing measures understate the extent of segregation, and that segregation increased in rural as well as urban areas. The dramatic decline in opposite-race neighbours during the 20th century may help to explain the persistence of racial inequality in the US.

Edward Glaeser, 05 September 2008

Edward Glaeser of Harvard University talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about the lessons from his research on how falling costs of communication and transportation have been kind to idea-producing cities like New York, Boston and London and devastating to goods-producing cities like Cleveland, Detroit and Glasgow. The interview was recorded at the American Economic Association meetings in New Orleans in January 2008.

Events

CEPR Policy Research