Ulrike Malmendier, 29 October 2021

When we live through a financial crisis, many of us think differently about money afterwards. Neuroscientists can show that the experience changes the physical structure of our brains, and Ulrike Malmendier tells Tim Phillips how this should also change the way that economists think about preferences for risk.

Read more about the research presented and download the free Discussion Paper

Malmendier, U. 2021. 'Experience Effects in Finance: Foundations, Applications, and Future Directions'.

Ulrike Malmendier, Leslie Sheng Shen, 15 March 2021

Economic crises have prolonged consequences on consumer behaviour, beyond effects captured by standard economic variables. Standard life-cycle consumption channels often fail to explain these lasting effects. This column argues that economic downturns ‘scar’ consumers in the long run. Consumers who have lived through times of high unemployment remain pessimistic about the future financial situation, spend less in future years, and accumulate more savings, controlling for income, wealth, and employment. These results suggest a novel micro-foundation of fluctuations in aggregate demand and imply long-run effects of macroeconomic shocks. 

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