Maria Chiara Paoli, Rick van der Ploeg, 04 October 2021

Despite climate justice advocates continuing to highlight climate inequities along racial, gender and class dimensions and policymakers’ vague statements in support of a ‘just transition’, there are few concrete plans. This column uses microsimulations of household behaviour from UK data to investigate the efficiency and equity impacts of different ways of recycling carbon tax revenue, focusing on both horizontal and vertical equity dimensions, and their implications for political feasibility. The authors find that rebating carbon tax revenues through social security payments renders the policy progressive and benefits the highest share of households in their sample.

Alexandra Avdeenko, Onur Eryilmaz, 03 August 2021

Sudden floods across Central Europe have led governments to initiate bailouts, putting decades-old debates on how to respond to future natural disasters back on the policy agenda. Using a representative longitudinal dataset, this column provides evidence that the 2013 floods in Germany reduced willingness to take risks among men living close to the flooded areas, but had no such effect on women. It also finds that affected households were significantly more likely to hold life insurance after the floods. The findings suggest that a portion of the costs associated with natural disasters is likely to be internalised by households at risk, with implications for governments seeking to provide incentives for household-level adaptation measures such as insurance or better building standards. 

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