Biagio Bossone, 21 April 2009

The IMF appointed a committee, chaired by Trevor Manuel, to look into IMF decision making. This column reviews the report, arguing that it misses critical question on Executive Board reform. Without an independent board, the Fund’s skewed voting power tends to produce uneven treatment of members. Decision-making power must ultimately rest with shareholders but they should be advised by an independent board that acts as the voice of the institution and its membership as a whole.

Kemal Derviş, 19 March 2009

What policy measures might reduce the economic damage developing countries suffer from the global crisis? This column says that developing economies should seek emergency liquidity, IMF reforms, greater fiscal support, and more humanitarian development assistance at the London summit next month.

Biagio Bossone, 18 February 2009

This column summarises the global crisis debate on institutional reforms to build global financial governance. While various authors disagree about the G20’s suitability and effectiveness, there is agreement that a number of IMF reforms are needed. Moreover, many call for the IMF to significantly increase its lending resources.

John Williamson, 14 February 2009

The IMF was created in part to help small economies deal with cyclical downturns. Yet few nations turn to the IMF except as a last resort. It sits hardly utilized in the face of the most severe shock the world has faced since the outbreak of WW I. This column argues that changing this unacceptable outcome requires two types of reforms.

Edwin Truman, 28 January 2009

The G20 leaders meeting in London on April 2 should complete the unfinished business of IMF reform. These are essential not only to reinstate the legitimacy and relevance of the IMF but also to support restoration of economic growth and stability to the global financial system.

Charles Wyplosz, 28 January 2009

A product of the confused reaction of politicians to the crisis, the G20 forum must prove its usefulness. Rather than striving to coordinate fiscal policy responses, leaders should use the G20 platform to strike common ground on long-term reforms to global financial regulation and supervision, starting by recapitalising the IMF and reforming its governance structures.

Barry Eichengreen, Richard Baldwin, 10 November 2008

This column introduces a collection of essays by leading economists from around the world on what the G20 leaders should do this weekend. Four priorities are identified: nations should act quickly to strengthen and coordinate their firefighting responses; they should immediately reinforce the IMF’s ability to fire-fight the crisis as it spreads to emerging markets and vulnerable developing nations; they should 'above all, do no harm'. Finally, they should start 'thinking outside the box' when it comes to long-run fixes.

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