Ernesto Zedillo, 28 April 2011

What is needed for the Doha Round of trade negotiations to reach a satisfactory end? This essay argues that the talks need nothing less than the involvement of heads of government. Deepening economic integration requires improved global governance and completing the Doha Round must be part of this. Failure would put globalisation, and the enormous benefits it has brought about, at serious risk.

Parthasarathi Shome, Francis Rathinam, 20 February 2011

The world anticipates many things from India over the coming years, but what does India expect from the rest of the world? This column explores India’s immediate and long-term concerns for the G20. It argues that India is focused on achieving a global framework for more inclusive economic growth that encompasses developed and developing countries, as well as emerging markets.

Marc Auboin, 25 November 2010

While liquidity has returned to the main routes of international trade, at the periphery a group of developing countries, particular low income one, are still suffering from lack of affordable trade financing. This column outlines how the recent G20 meeting in Seoul has provided a mandate to multilateral institutions to address this problem.

Nicolas Véron, 19 November 2010

The endorsement of the Basel III accord on financial regulation at the recent G20 meetings in Seoul represents one of the event’s main outcomes. This column argues that while this initiative should be welcomed, global finance cannot realistically be submitted to a single rulebook and significant challenges remain.

Ernesto Zedillo, 18 November 2010

How should we judge the 2010 Seoul G20 meeting? A failure, according to this column. It argues that the G20’s failure to coordinate economic policies puts the global economy at risk and that there is little in the G20 Seoul Action Plan addressing the tensions that preceded the summit.

Biagio Bossone, 15 November 2010

The G20 meeting in Seoul last week still leaves many issues unresolved. This column addresses the G20 leaders and calls for global governance that can meet the needs of a global economy.

The Editors, 12 November 2010

The ongoing G20 summit addresses a wide range of economic policy questions. While some are familiar topics about which there is a professional consensus, several of the issues put political leaders at the far edges of our economic understanding. A series of Vox columns by leading economists has marshalled the best available theory and empirics to help illuminate the choices facing world leaders this week in Seoul. As a service to readers in a hurry, this column provides links to the most recent contributions.

Simon Evenett, 12 November 2010

The Seoul summit marks the end of the second year of the G20's crisis-related activities. This column takes stock of the G20's accomplishments and methods of operation, identifying what can reasonably be expected of the G20 over the medium term. It argues that a series of evolving accommodations – articulated imprecisely to outsiders – is the most that governments and analysts should expect.

The Editors, 09 November 2010

In preparation for this week’s meeting of the G20, CEPR recently held a major conference on financial regulation – The Future of Regulatory Reform – bringing together senior policymakers, leading academics and industry practitioners. This column presents a report and video highlighting some of the speakers’ key recommendations.

Simon Evenett, 08 November 2010

The Korean hosts of this week's G20 summit are apparently keen to raise the profile of protectionism and to develop a development-friendly trade initiative. With these possible goals in mind the Eighth Report of the Global Trade Alert, published today, assesses the global state of protectionism, the quality of G20 leadership on trade, and the harm done to the most vulnerable developing countries by other country's beggar-thy-neighbour policies.

Daniel Bradlow, 13 August 2010

The global crisis has helped promote the G20 from supporting role to one of the leading forums on the world stage. This column argues that the G20 presents a unique opportunity for its medium-sized members to influence the global economic agenda – but only if they base their short-term actions on a long-term vision.

Simon Evenett, 23 June 2010

This Report of the Global Trade Alert, published to coincide with the Toronto G-20 Leaders' Summit in June 2010, presents a comprehensive global overview of protectionist trends since the last G-20 summit in September 2009.

Kavaljit Singh, 05 July 2010

Despite recovering faster than developed countries, many emerging markets are struggling to cope with large capital inflows. This column discusses the recent capital controls imposed by Indonesia and South Korea. It argues that while the international community is warming to these policies, it would be wrong to view capital controls as a panacea.

Beatrice Weder di Mauro, Ulrich Klüh, Marco Wagner, Hasan Doluca, 26 June 2010

As G20 leaders meet to discuss financial reform, this column argues that it is not too late for an international solution. It says that the EU and US should lead the way with a tax on systemically important financial institutions. Beyond internalising the costs of systemic risk, such a levy would make an international agreement more likely and raise substantial funds.

Barry Eichengreen, Andrew Rose, 21 June 2010

China’s announcement of greater renminbi flexibility was welcomed by US and European leaders. This column discusses new empirical research on what happens to economies when they exit exchange rate pegs that are resisting appreciation. Data from 27 cases suggest that growth slows but only modestly, and there is no evidence of economic and financial damage as a result – certainly nothing like the fears that China's next decade could look like Japan’s lost decade.

Enrico Perotti, 09 May 2010

The recent IMF report to the G20 states that fiscal reforms are essential to recover the costs of the crisis, as well as to contain future risk creation. This column argues that progress on controlling future risk requires a direct tax on systemic risk. This would restore confidence in the ability of policymakers to act preventively in future.

Enrico Perotti, 07 April 2010

What should an effective macro-prudential policy framework look like? This column argues that financial stability and macroeconomic stability should be dealt with differently. One requires prompt corrective action; the other requires more gradual policy intervention. Systemic levies offer a policy that can tighten financial discipline without the need for a large increase in interest rates across the whole economy.

Pradumna Rana, 14 November 2009

Will the faster-than-expected recovery from the global crisis cause governments to avoid much-needed reforms? This column says it shouldn’t, as important developing countries can now drive reforms via the G20. It suggests how Asia could leverage its growing economic weight into more effective G20 participation.

Biagio Bossone, 17 October 2009

The G20 recently asserted itself as the “the primary forum for our international economic cooperation.” This column questions the efficiency and legitimacy of such governance. It says that the IMF – the only multilateral financial institution with universal representation – is the natural place for international financial policy cooperation.

Jeffry Frieden, 16 October 2009

Jeffry Frieden, professor of government at Harvard University, talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about global economic governance – including the world trading system, financial regulation and the G-20 – and their interactions with domestic politics, particularly in the United States. The interview was recorded at the Global Economic Symposium in Schleswig-Holstein in September 2009.

Pages

Events

CEPR Policy Research