Kati Suominen, 03 October 2009

The G20 summit in Pittsburgh produced some results, but challenges lie ahead. This column says world leaders need to implement internationally coordinated macroeconomic policy changes even when they may clash with domestic political imperatives, conclude the Doha Round, and harmonise the spree of financial regulatory reforms now in motion around the world.

Axel Weber, 02 October 2009

Axel Weber, President of the Deutsche Bundesbank, talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about the need to rebalance between risk-taking and regulation in financial markets. They discuss the opportunity for central bankers and other G20 players to design and implement new regulation, and the likely future size of the financial sector in the overall economy. The interview was recorded at the Global Economic Symposium in Schleswig-Holstein in September 2009.

Simon Evenett, 24 September 2009

Simon Evenett of the University of St Gallen talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about ‘Broken Promises’, the latest report from Global Trade Alert, which collates information on state measures taken since last November that discriminate against foreign commercial interests, and reveals how the G20 countries have broken their 'no protectionism' pledge. The interview was recorded in Geneva at the inaugural Thinking Ahead on International Trade conference in September 2009.

Peter Draper, Cézanne Samuel, 22 September 2009

What agenda should South Africa take into the G20 meeting in Pittsburgh? This column highlights crisis funding for distressed African economies, IMF reform, global financial governance, and resisting protectionism.

Simon Evenett, 22 September 2009

Economists have been particularly wary of protectionism since the recession’s onset. This column presents new evidence that numerous governments, including G20 nations, have implemented protectionist measures. It calls for G20 members to halt further trade-distorting measures and review those identified by major monitoring initiatives.

Marc Auboin, 05 June 2009

CEPR Policy Insight No. 35 lays out some recent facts and explains the decisions made at the G20 London Summit regarding the supply of trade finance.

Marc Auboin, 05 June 2009

Trade finance, which supports the bulk of world trade, has deteriorated during the crisis and will continue to worsen in 2009. This column says that the response of public-backed institutions has been insufficient to cover the gap between supply and demand of trade finance worldwide. The G20 has adopted a wider package for injecting some $250 billion in order to further support trade finance.

Peter Drysdale, Hadi Soesastro, 07 April 2009

This column says the G20 summit was a remarkable event as leaders crafted a coherent set of strategies to address the crisis. The Asian participants emerged as a constructive force, agreeing to expand their role in IMF funding and governance, ease the trade credit bottleneck, and advocate the standstill on trade barriers.

Carmine Di Noia, Stefano Micossi, 01 April 2009

What are feasible policy responses to the crisis? This column argues for simple but significant changes in international imbalances, financial regulation, global coordination, and micro-prudential regulation.
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Fred Bergsten, 28 March 2009

The financial crisis is a global phenomenon. The downturn continues to be rapidly transmitted across borders through trade and financial channels. A global policy response to provide fiscal stimulus, avoid protectionism and help developing countries is imperative. The G20 summit in London provides a unique opportunity to mobilise the needed cooperation.

John Williamson, 24 March 2009

This column says that institutional reform is unique in that it could simultaneously address the short-run agenda of combating the collapse of aggregate demand and the long-run agenda of building a global economy fit for the 21st century. IMF reform has to be at the forefront of such an initiative.

Rajiv Kumar, 21 March 2009

In the long run, a number of analysts believe that the G20 should replace the G8. This column argues that the G20 summit should focus on producing tangible outcomes that will clean up the financial sector and prevent a protectionist outbreak. Despite their obvious importance, other issues, including grand reforms, can wait.

Daniel Bradlow, 18 March 2009

Will the G20 agree to the reforms needed to make the IMF an effective part of international financial governance? The prospects are grim because it would require difficult political compromises or amendments to the IMF’s Articles of Agreement. Yet reforms are needed to address the IMF’s coordination with other international institutions, the scope of the financial regulatory regime, and its representative legitimacy. This column some initial steps the G20 might take.

Peter Draper, 16 March 2009

The gathering economic crisis has induced major economic problems for African countries. This column highlights several key priorities for (South) African representatives to take into the London Summit, including maintaining access to finance, open markets and redoubling African economic reform efforts.

Hadi Soesastro, 10 March 2009

The G20 has stepped up to provide political guidance to global economic governance. This column argues that East Asian members should embrace a pro-active role aimed not only at securing their role in global economic governance but also at increasing East Asia’s effectiveness in projecting the region’s strategic efforts towards global economic recovery.

Mathias Dewatripont, Xavier Freixas, Richard Portes, 09 March 2009

The crisis is global; the solutions must be cooperative and coherent across countries. This column introduces the recent ebook on the fundamental financial and macroeconomic issues over which the G20 leaders should agree, stressing above all the short-run policy imperatives.

Richard Baldwin, Simon Evenett, 05 March 2009

This column introduces a new ebook presenting in-depth analysis of i) the collapse of global trade, and ii) the new, murkier protection emerging as governments around the world massively increase their role in the economy. A negative protection-recession spiral is one of the few things that have not yet gone wrong in this crisis. The book presents concrete steps that G20 leader should take to avoid such a spiral and the threat it would pose to global recovery.

Richard Baldwin, Simon Evenett, 05 March 2009

This eBook presents concrete steps that G20 leaders should take to avoid a negative protection-recession spiral and the threat it would pose to a global recovery.

Mathias Dewatripont, Xavier Freixas, Richard Portes, 02 March 2009

This new eBook analyzes a range of policy proposals for how the G20 process and the London Summit might bring about concrete, implementable results that can restore confidence and lead the way to recovery.

Francisco Rodríguez, 23 February 2009

The development theme in the Global Crisis Debate has elicited many important and novel contributions on what the crisis means for the developing world and how developing nations should react. This column provides a synthesis and commentary of the key proposals.

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