Chad Bown, Euijin Jung, Zhiyao (Lucy) Lu, 19 June 2018

Bei Qin, David Strömberg, Yanhui Wu, 25 May 2018

The Chinese government has invested heavily in surveillance systems that exploit information on social media. This column shows that these systems are very effective, even in their simplest form. From the government’s point of view, social media, although unattractive as a potential outlet for organised social protest, is useful as a method to surveil protests, monitor local officials, and disseminate propaganda.

Ashoka Mody, 01 April 2018

Simon Evenett, Johannes Fritz, 03 May 2018

A new front on protectionism has opened up in policymaking circles, with Chinese manufacturing being used as a pretext to raise trade barriers. This column presents the new Global Trade Alert report which challenges the empirical and conceptual basis for doing so. 

Richard Pomfret, 02 May 2018

China’s Belt and Road Initiative has the potential to extend the Eurasian Landbridge to include both the current China-Poland mainline to western Europe and a China-Istanbul mainline with spurs to the Middle East and North Africa. This column, the second in a two-part series, outlines the history of the initiative and argues that future construction on the network could be a major step towards Eurasian integration and greatly improve rail's competitiveness relative to air for time-sensitive shipments.

Lionel Fontagné, Gianluca Santoni, 30 April 2018

Country-pairs self-select in regional trade agreements, and this endogeneity biases the estimation of the impact of such agreements within a gravity framework. This column uses a framework for predicting which countries should engage in RTAs based solely on economic determinants, including global value chains, and compares this ‘natural’ geography of agreements with the actual geography. The results suggest that the endogenous geography of RTAs is shaped by the development of GVCs.

Stefan Legge, Piotr Lukaszuk, Simon Evenett, 17 April 2018

While the Trump administration’s proposed tariff increases on Chinese imports have grabbed the headlines, few realise that other trading partners have also raised tariffs on Chinese trade. This column examines the effects of the EU removing China from its General System of Preferences in 2012. As a result of the move, $242 billion worth of EU imports from China were subject to higher tariffs, raising EU customs revenue by an estimated $4 billion.

Kun Jiang, Wolfgang Keller, Larry D. Qiu, William Ridley, 15 April 2018

China’s government mandates that foreign investors in certain industries form joint ventures with a domestic Chinese partner. The column uses a dataset accounting for all joint ventures in China from 1998 to 2007 to show that this policy is successful in its aim of encouraging technology transfer from foreign investors to domestic operations. It finds empirical evidence for the existence of at least three channels through which this transfer takes place.

Eugenio Cerutti, Haonan Zhou, 09 February 2018

Chinese banks have continued to expand rapidly both domestically and abroad. Together, they constitute the largest banking sector in the world by far. This column places the Chinese banking system in a global context. Although very small relative to their domestic claims, Chinese banks’ foreign claims are substantial for many borrower countries in Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean in particular. Many of these banking connections are related to Chinese outward foreign direct investment, with fewer related to trade linkages.

Kristian Behrens, Brahim Boualam, Julien Martin, 03 January 2018

Policymakers strive to encourage resilience among firms. We often assume that industry clustering creates resistance to shocks. This column uses the evidence from Chinese imports in the Canadian textile industry to show that firms in clusters were in fact no more resilient to the ‘China shock’.

Chen Lin, Randall Morck, Bernard Yeung, Xiaofeng Zhao, 22 December 2017

Chinese stocks rose sharply overall on news of President’s Xi’s 2012 policy cracking down on corruption, but non-state-owned enterprises in the country’s least liberalised provinces actually lost value. This column argues that China has taught the world something interesting – that prior market liberalisation makes anticorruption reforms more valuable. Once market forces are activated, bribe-hungry officials no longer grease the wheels but instead become pests and invite eradication.

Shang-Jin Wei, 01 November 2017

Could the housing prices in China crash? In this video, Shang-Jin Wei explains whiat are the potential concerns, and how the Chinese government could mitigate them. This video was recorded at the "10 years after the crisis" conference held in London, on 22 September 2017.

Leonardo Iacovone, Mariana Pereira-López, Marc Schiffbauer, 30 October 2017

In spite of its potential, the use of digital technology is still basic in most developing countries. This column presents evidence that firms in Mexico facing higher external competition have used IT more intensively and efficiently. External competition has encouraged them to make the necessary complementary investments in innovation and organisational changes.

Mariassunta Giannetti, Xiaoyun Yu, 30 October 2017

One of Chinese President Xi Jinping’s defining policies has been in the fight against corruption, which hinders innovation and growth by creating privileges for established firms. This column shows that extensive corruption in China may indeed have hampered the process of firm progress, and that the anti-corruption campaign has been a good move towards favouring an efficient allocation of resources and, ultimately, sustained growth.

Francisco Costa, Jason Garred, João Pessoa, 24 September 2017

In addition to being a competitor for other countries’ industries, China has also become an increasingly important consumer of goods produced elsewhere. This column looks at how the steep rise in ‘commodities-for-manufactures’ trade with China has affected workers in Brazil. While the analysis confirms a negative effect of Chinese import competition on employees of manufacturing firms, it also suggests that growth in trade with China has created some winners in Brazil, with wages rising more quickly in parts of the country benefiting more from increasing Chinese demand.

Kalina Manova, Zhihong Yu, 22 September 2017

Pinpointing how multi-product firms organise their operations is key for understanding the drivers of global competitiveness. This column presents a theory on the behaviour of multi-product firms when cost and quality competitiveness jointly determine export performance. Using Chinese data, it finds that firms’ production and sales activity across products and markets is governed by a product hierarchy based on quality. This phenomenon also determines how firms respond to economic shocks.

Peter Robertson, Longfeng Ye, 11 September 2017

The conventional wisdom is that labour reallocation has been a key driver of China’s growth miracle, and slowing migrant labour flows and rapid wage growth have raised concerns over whether this source of growth has run its course. This column argues that the literature on growth and labour reallocation in China has been dominated by a method that, relative to the now standard growth accounting model, substantially overstates the gains. Allowing for this and for human capital differences across sectors, sectoral labour reallocation has not been a key source of productivity growth in China.

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