Marvin Goodfriend, Eswar Prasad, 22 August 2007

US and EU pressure on China to revalue the renminbi create the mistaken impression that there is an unavoidable conflict of interests. A switch by China to a more flexible exchange rate regime, accompanied by a shift to a new nominal anchor, would serve China’s domestic interests and simultaneously defuse protectionist sentiments abroad. A politically savvy recasting of this issue as one of Chinese monetary-policy independence could help solve many problems.

Daniel Lederman, Marcelo Olarreaga, Guillermo Perry, 08 August 2007

Chinese and Indian growth has generally helped by pushing up prices of commodities where Latin America has a comparative advantage and by encouraging positive trade and FDI spillovers. Some industries and firms in some countries, however, have been hurt.

Jean Pisani-Ferry, 06 July 2007

When the IMF was a monitor of borrowers’ policies, dominance of the IMF Board by creditor countries was natural, but an institution whose main role is to facilitate global consultations and arbitrate currency disputes needs a more balanced shareholder structure.

Tim Besley, Masayuki Kudamatsu, 05 July 2007

Autocracies are bad, but are sometimes economically successful. Empirical analysis provides lessons on how to institutionalise good government in a wider context.

Richard Pomfret, 22 June 2007

Since 2000, East Asian countries have signed over 70 trade agreements. Is this ‘noodle bowl’ of regional agreements in the world’s most dynamic economic region a threat to the multilateral global trading system and to other regions’ economic prosperity?

Shang-Jin Wei, 16 June 2007

Data on 12,400 firms in 120 Chinese cities show that state-owned firms have lower marginal returns to capital than private or foreign firms. This inefficiency costs China 5% of its GDP and suggests there would be big gains to further financial and corporate-governance reforms.

Jeffrey Frankel, Shang-Jin Wei, 23 April 2007

The authors of CEPR DP6264 analyse the precise nature of China's exchange rate regime from July 2005 to early 2007 and make some surprising discoveries.

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