David Bloom, Paige Kirby, JP Sevilla, Andrew Stawasz, 03 December 2018

Worldwide ageing trends are steering global demographics into uncharted territory, transforming populations and societies around the globe. Japan is leading the way in this growth wave as the world’s oldest population and is now grappling with the substantial socioeconomic burdens an ageing population places on society. This column discusses the coming challenges associated with population ageing alongside plausible solutions. While there is no magic bullet for these challenges, there is scope to devise a multi-pronged solutions portfolio of complementary initiatives that includes a number of measures to promote and protect elderly health.  

Thomas Cooley, Espen Henriksen, 11 June 2018

Demographic change represents an important contributing factor to the slowdown of long-run growth. This column explores some of the channels through which this occurs and how the effects of demographic change can be mitigated. Policies that target consumption-saving choices, labour-leisure choices, and human capital accumulation over the lifecycle are likely to be most effective.

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The conference focuses on demographic change and immigration in industrialized countries and on the ways these phenomena interact with employment, wages, and participation in the labor market. Researchers are invited to submit empirical and theoretical contributions on this topic from all areas of economics and sociology.

The conference is sponsored by the German Research Foundation (DFG) as part of the Priority Program “The German Labor Market in a Globalized World – Challenges through Trade, Technology, and Demographics” (SPP 1764) and the Labor and Socio-Economic Research Center (LASER) at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg.

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The conference focuses on demographic change and immigration in industrialized countries and on the ways these phenomena interact with employment, wages, and participation in the labor market. Researchers are invited to submit empirical and theoretical contributions on this topic from all areas of economics and sociology.
Keynote speakers are Anne Case (Princeton University), Christian Dustmann (University College London), David Green (University of British Columbia, Vancouver) and Irena Kogan (University of Mannheim).

Please submit full papers (preliminary versions are welcome) as a PDF file to Angelika Ganserer via email to [email protected]. If possible, include up to four JEL Codes. Travel and accommodation costs will be reimbursed for speakers (one speaker per paper).
Deadline for paper submission is 20 December 2017. Selection decisions will be made by 25 January 2018.

Craig McIntosh, Gordon Hanson, 15 November 2016

At first glance, the migration pressures on the EU and US appear similar, but recent history is not a reliable guide to future trends. This column uses demographic trends to predict that the US will experience a gradual decline in its newly arrived immigrant population, while the EU, ringed by nearby high-population-growth states, will see large increases in the stock of first-generation immigrants. As a result, US emphasis on strengthening borders and returning undocumented migrants may be misplaced.

Peter Diamond, 02 September 2011

Nobel laureate Peter Diamond of MIT talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about of the impact of improved longevity and the resulting demographic change on the retirement and healthcare systems of the advanced economies. The interview was recorded in August 2011 at the Fourth Lindau Meeting on Economic Sciences, which brought together 17 of the 38 living economics laureates with nearly 400 top young economists from around the world. [Also read the transcript]

Torben M Andersen, 06 January 2009

How will the shrinking labour force pay for the pensions and healthcare of the growing elderly? This column argues that linking retirement ages to longevity would alleviate a significant part of the deterioration in public finances and ensure that the burden of adjustment is carried by those gaining from increases in longevity.

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