Girum Abebe, Stefano Caria, Marcel Fafchamps, Paolo Falco, Simon Franklin, Simon Quinn, 09 December 2016

Youth unemployment is a growing problem around the world, particularly in urban areas. This column assesses the impact of labour market interventions in Addis Ababa targeting two issues commonly faced by unemployed youth: job search costs and a poor ability to signal their skills. A transport subsidy and a job application workshop were both found to have significant positive effects on youth labour market outcomes, pointing to the important role policymakers can play in helping young people find satisfying employment.

Michèle Belot, Philipp Kircher, Paul Muller, 10 March 2016

Not much is known about the value of simply advising job seekers on what types of jobs to search for. This column investigates whether the search behaviour and job prospects of the unemployed are affected by providing low-cost personalised labour market information on potential alternative occupations. The results of a randomised trial show that personalised suggestions not only lead to a ‘broader’ search strategy, but also increase the number of interviews, particularly for job seekers that search narrowly.

Arash Nekoei, Andrea Weber, 10 July 2015

The generosity of unemployment insurance is often cited as a reason for long spells of joblessness. But this view neglects other important, and potentially positive, economic aspects of such programmes. Using Austrian data, this column presents evidence that unemployment insurance has a positive effect on the quality of jobs that recipients find. This can in turn have a positive effect on future tax revenues, and has implications for the debate on optimal insurance generosity.

Jennifer C Smith, 18 July 2011

Labour-market policy can try to make it easier to get hired or harder to get fired. This column asks which of these approaches policymakers should prioritise. Focusing on the UK, it finds that while job-finding rates could be improved, policies aimed at reducing the amount of job losses during a recession play an equally important role despite being less in vogue.

Laurent Gobillon, Thierry Magnac, Harris Selod, 19 March 2007

The authors of CEPR DP6198 and DP6199 focus on Paris to discover the effects of location on unemployment. They find that around 30% of the spatial disparities in duration of unemployment in Paris can be attributed to personal characteristics of workers, while around 70% can be attributed to characteristics of the local area.

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