Lawrence Katz, 15 May 2009

Lawrence Katz of Harvard University talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about his book (co-authored with Claudia Goldin), The Race between Education and Technology, a history of US economic inequality and the roles of technological change and the pace of educational advance in affecting the wage structure. The interview was recorded at the American Economic Association meetings in San Francisco in January 2009.

James Heckman, 25 August 2008

America has a growing skills problem. This column emphasises the importance of early environments in determining skills. It suggests that to promote skills, public policy should refocus attention to the early years of childhood and away from its current emphasis on the later years.

Ian Dew-Becker, Robert J. Gordon, 19 June 2008

Only the top 10% of US earners have seen their incomes grow faster than productivity since 1966. Part of the top-earner income growth is driven by market forces (superstar economics); the only feasible pro-equality policy here is more progressive taxation. For top corporate executives, however, non-market forces (CEO-Board complicity in pay setting) are important, so other policies are warranted. Increased disclosure and improved corporate governance would distribute economic gains more evenly across society and boost firms’ value.

Giuseppe Bertola, 11 October 2007

Empirical research shows that EMU improves economic performance, but is also associated with higher inequality and lower social spending. This casts doubt on the political sustainability of EMU without social-policy integration and much deeper financial market development. Thinking about EMU’s future, it would be wrong and dangerous to disregard the implications for income inequality and its remedies.

Stefan Bach, Giacomo Corneo, Viktor Steiner, 11 June 2007

Using a data set that covers the entire German adult population, the authors of Policy Insight No. 4 show that income inequality in Germany has increased much more than previous studies suggest.

Stefan Bach, Giacomo Corneo, Viktor Steiner, 06 June 2007

Detailed data on the complete German income distribution reveal growing inequality, especially at the high end.

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