Nikhil Agarwal, Charles Hodgson, Paulo Somaini, 17 January 2021

In the US, most patients who need a kidney transplant must participate in a centralised deceased-donor kidney allocation mechanism. The allocation system seeks to make the best use of available organs and maximise ‘life years from transplant’. This column estimates the life years from transplant generated by the US kidney assignment system, using data on transplants and outcomes for patients on the waiting list between 2000 and 2010. Patient choice to reject or accept the transplant increases life years from transplant. The policy goal to maximise life years from transplant would result in younger, healthier patients receiving transplants at the expense of older, more urgently sick patients.

Jean Tirole, 29 September 2017

Why do we behave differently from our self-interests? In this video, Jean Tirole talks about the economics of ethics, and the drivers of human behavior. This video was recorded at the 6th Lindau Meeting on Economic Sciences in September 2017.

Julio J. Elias, Nicola Lacetera, Mario Macis, 15 October 2016

Certain ‘repugnant’ transactions, such as the sale of organs, are prohibited on moral grounds, despite substantial potential efficiency gains. This column uses a survey-based experiment to explore public perceptions of the morality–efficiency trade-off in the context of the US kidney procurement system. Respondents are found to accept higher levels of repugnance for higher levels of efficiency. These results suggest room for efficiency concerns alongside moral and ethical considerations.

Christian Schubert, 22 January 2016

Nudges are modifications of people’s choice architecture that impact their behaviour but don’t change their incentives or coerce them. As a policy instrument, nudges have been shown to be effective in changing certain kinds of behaviours. This column explores the ethical issues that arise in employing such potentially manipulative policies. An evaluation programme is outlined that explores a potential policy’s impact on people’s wellbeing, autonomy, and integrity, along with its practical implications.

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This 3 day conference at St Catherine's College, Oxford University hosts speakers from Oxford, LSE, UCL, World Bank brings together many of the new and emerging themes in the economics of welfare. Theory tracks focus on social choice and welfare, and other related aspects of welfare economic theory and public economics. Empirical/applied tracks focus on policy areas including health, development, social policy, environment, education, poverty reduction, non-monetary measures of economic progress etc. Papers on applied econometrics or experimental work relevant to welfare economic theory and assumptions about human behaviour also welcome.

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