Frédéric Robert-Nicoud, Christian Hilber, 18 March 2013

Zoning policies and land use regulations are widespread. This column presents recent research suggesting that regulations have in fact gone too far. Land use regulation is the outcome of competing property owner and land developer pressure groups, and it seems that local authorities respond well to lobbying, in addition to more traditional welfare and electoral considerations. The most over-restrictive regulation is in highly desirable places, New York and San Francisco being some of the worst offenders.

Thomas Stephens, Jean-Robert Tyran, 23 November 2012

Despite its meagre real returns in the long run, many people still think that investing in housing is a good idea. This column argues that a major reason for the tendency to buy houses is that it’s rare to lose money. Recent research shows people’s perceptions of housing transactions to be shaped by whether they gain or lose money – above and beyond the real returns.

Joshua Aizenman, Ilan Noy, 25 August 2012

In the years leading up to the global crisis, the US focused on subsidising home ownership, whereas Germany placed much more emphasis on education and vocational training. While it is easy to think that this explains the subsequent performance of the two economies, this column provides some much needed economic analysis.

Agar Brugiavini, Viola Angelini, Guglielmo Weber, 12 March 2012

In January the UK government launched an initiative to help the elderly downsize into smaller homes – and provoked the ire of pensioner groups nationwide. This reluctance to downsize to among the elderly perplexes economists, who maintain that leveraging housing wealth can help pensioners maintain a good standard of living on a fixed income. CEPR DP8889 investigates what is behind European pensioners’ puzzling housing decisions.

Thomas Philippon, Virgiliu Midrigan, 16 May 2011

In the recent US recession, those states which saw the biggest increases in household leverage during the credit boom suffered greatest hits to output and employment rates. The authors of CEPR DP 8381 try to understand this anomaly with a new model of a cash-in-advance economy, where economic activity is highly sensitive to credit conditions. They argue that this framework supports the use of expansionary monetary policy to mitigate recessions.

Leah Boustan, Robert Margo, 12 February 2011

Economists and sociologists have long maintained that mass movement of whites to US suburbs harmed remaining inner city residents by reducing the tax base and fostering isolated racial enclaves. This column argues that white suburbanisation had a silver lining – it indirectly contributed to the rise in black homeownership.

Stephen Cecchetti, 13 June 2007

With inflation targets winning the world of Central Banking, methods for measuring inflation have direct policy consequences. The big question for inflation measurement is how to handle housing. The US methods are better than the ECB methods.

Pages

Events

CEPR Policy Research