Guay Lim, Robert Dixon, Jan van Ours, 28 January 2019

One version of Okun’s law specifies a relationship between the change in the unemployment rate and output growth. This column uses US labour market flows data to investigate this relationship between 1990 and 2017. It finds that the net flows between employment and unemployment are sensitive to changes in growth but respond differently to positive and negative changes. This implies that the US Okun relationship is stable but asymmetric, the effect of a change being larger in contractionary periods than in expansionary ones. 

Antonio Fatás, 16 June 2018

Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, 17 November 2017

How do people respond to variations in economic growth? In this video, Jan-Emmanuel De Neve explains how the recent recession negatively affects people's wellbeing. This video was recorded at the Centre for Economic Performance (LSE) in September 2014.

James Stock, 02 June 2017

How do unexpected changes in the economy affect inflation or GDP growth rate? In this video, James Stock explains how unexpected changes can be isolated. This video was recorded at the Royal Economic Society Annual Conference held in Bristol in April 2017.

Bridget Hoffmann, 07 October 2016

What is the impact of climate change on the US economy? In this video, Bridget Hoffman compares summer temperatures to make predictions about future GDP growth. This video was recorded during the European Economic Association's Congress held in Geneva at the end of August 2016.

Emmanuel De Veirman, 07 December 2015

Firms are believed to have more uncertain prospects during recessions, possibly deepening economic downturns. This column argues that the relationship between firm uncertainty and GDP growth is much weaker than is commonly assumed. Further, firms’ prospects were not particularly uncertain during the Great Recession. Lastly, firm-specific uncertainty does not appear to have an important effect on the business cycle.

Jan-Emmanuel De Neve, Michael Norton, 08 October 2014

How do macroeconomic changes affect people’s wellbeing?  This column presents evidence that the life satisfaction of individuals is between two and eight times more sensitive to negative economic growth than it is to positive economic growth. Engineering economic ‘booms’ that risk even short ‘busts’ is unlikely to improve social wellbeing in the long run.

Markus Eberhardt, 11 May 2014

The debt-growth link is essential to today's marcoeconomic policy choices. This Vox Talk discusses new evidence based on data on total public debt for 105 economies between 1972 and 2009 and two centuries of data for the UK, US, Sweden and Japan. There is no convincing proof that austerity works and that it is dangerous for policy makers to pretend otherwise.

Lúcio Vinhas de Souza, 07 February 2013

Commodity price shocks are frequently considered among the most important potential threats to the global economy. However, since the second half of the 1980s, energy prices have experienced very large changes, with arguably limited effects on global GDP developments. This column presents evidence that oil shocks just aren’t what they used to be when it comes to macroeconomic effects.

Nicholas Oulton, 22 December 2012

The idea of having GDP growth as the main target of economic policy has been under attack in recent years. This column addresses some of the criticisms and argues that continued GDP growth would be good for the UK and other European countries – and not just in the short term to reduce high levels of unemployment.

Dani Rodrik, 31 October 2011

If rich and poor countries have access to the same technology, shouldn't their productivity levels eventually converge? This would imply that poor countries should grow more quickly until they catch up – but such a tendency has never been proven. CEPR DP8631 shows that this convergence in output does in fact occur – but within manufacturing sectors rather than in economies as a whole.

Domenico Giannone, Lucrezia Reichlin, Saverio Simonelli, 23 November 2009

The UK’s early estimate of GDP growth for the third quarter of 2009 still shows negative growth with a reading of -0.4%. This column combines the quarterly releases of GDP with timely survey data to form a “now-cast” of quarterly GDP growth. It says that the UK has likely exited the recession already, estimating positive growth of 0.15%.

Francesco Daveri, 05 June 2009

The post-crisis data indicate that Italy is faring worse than the rest of Europe, except Germany. Moreover, the Italian economy entered a period of hardships and disappointing growth well before the mortgage crisis developed. This column argues that Italy cannot afford to postpone reforms if it wants to resume faster long-run growth.

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