Fabio Berton, Sauro Mocetti, Andrea Presbitero, Matteo Richiardi, 09 February 2017

Understanding the real effects of financial shocks is essential for the design of effective growth-restoring policies. This column uses data on job contracts matched with the universe of firms and their banks from a region of Italy to analyse the employment effects of financial shocks. Financially constrained firms – especially the least productive ones – significantly reduced employment, mostly of less-educated and lower-skilled workers with temporary contracts. While these results suggest possible distributional effects across workers, they could also reflect a productivity-enhancing reallocation function of financial shocks.

Philippe Bacchetta, Kenza Benhima, Céline Poilly, 19 February 2015

The corporate cash ratio – the share of liquid assets in total assets – comoves with employment in the US. This column argues that disentangling liquidity shocks and credit shocks is key to understanding this comovement, and that liquidity shocks appear to be crucial. These shocks make production less attractive or more difficult to finance, while they also generate a need for internal liquidity to pay wages, which can be satisfied by holding more cash.

Patrick Minford, Vo Phuong Mai Le, David Meenagh, 15 July 2012

This paper adds the Bernanke-Gertler-Gilchrist model to a modified version of the Smets-Wouters model of the US in order to explore the causes of the banking crisis. The authors find that banking crises occur on average once every 40 years and around half are accompanied by financial crisis. Financial shocks on their own, even when extreme, do not cause crises, provided the government acts swiftly to counteract such a shock.

Urban Jermann, Vincenzo Quadrini, 29 September 2009

The financial crisis has made it clear that macroeconomic models need to allocate a more prominent role to financial frictions. This column provides a framework where the financial sector can be the “source” of business cycle fluctuations. The model suggests that credit shocks have played an important role in all major recessions experienced by the US economy during the last two and a half decades.

Hubert Escaith, Fabien Gonguet, 16 June 2009

How do firm linkages transmit shocks? This column discusses the real and financial transmission mechanisms in the supply chain and financial system that can create troublesome cascades. It applies its logic to the Asia Pacific production chain.

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