Mark Schankerman, Alberto Galasso, 31 August 2008

The 'market for innovation' - the licensing and sale of patents - is one of the principal incentives for firms to invest in R&D. In CEPR DP 6946, Galasso and Schankerman set out to examine the impact that US developments have had on market efficiency, by studying the length of patent infringement disputes and find that the US system has performed surprisingly well in recent decades.

Bruno van Pottelsberghe de la Potterie, Gaétan de Rassenfosse, 01 June 2008

Patent-based measures of innovation are often accused of reflecting the propensity to patent rather than actual research productivity. This column presents a better measure of patenting that reflects research productivity and identifies policies that affect research productivity and the propensity to patent.

Sudipto Bhattacharya, Sergei Guriev, 09 November 2007

Patenting has soared in recent decades, but much intermediate knowledge is protected by industrial secrecy, so relaxing patent protection must impact the secrecy option. Recent research suggests that the relationship between patent protection and knowledge transmission is hump-shaped and sector-specific. This suggests that patent protection standards should be sector-specific.

Antonio Cabrales, 21 June 2007

Regulating prices in the pharmaceutical markets can be rather ineffective from a welfare-enhancing viewpoint and the US, despite its complaints, does not seem to have significantly higher prices than other countries with similar income levels.

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