Marzio Bassanin, Ester Faia, Valeria Patella, 30 August 2019

Macroeconomic models with credit frictions do a good job of explaining debt falls during financial crises, but fail to account for pre-crisis debt increases and level pro-cyclicality. This column introduces a model in which investors’ beliefs about future collateral values are non-linear. Greater ambiguity optimism during booms and greater aversion during recessions closely model the empirical shifts seen before and during financial crises, highlighting the joint role of financial frictions and beliefs distortions for market developments.

Thorsten Beck, Emily Jones , Peter Knaack, 15 October 2018

In today’s world of globalised finance, regulators in developing countries have to weigh up the international ramifications of their decisions. This column presents the results of a research project which combines cross-country panel analysis and in-depth case studies of the political economy of the adoption of Basel II/III in the developing world. It finds that regulators in developing countries do not merely adopt Basel II/III because these standards provide the optimal technical solution to financial stability risks in their jurisdictions; concerns about reputation and competition are also important. 

Jose Apesteguia, Joerg Oechssler, Simon Weidenholzer, 29 September 2018

Copy trading platforms, which allow traders on social networks to receive information on the success of other agents in financial markets and to directly copy their trades, have attracted millions of users in recent years. This column examines the implications of copy trading for investors’ risk taking. An experiment reveals that providing information on the success of others significantly increases risk taking, and that this increase is even greater when the option to directly copy others is present. The findings suggest that copy trading platforms may lead to excessive risk taking and reduce ex ante welfare.

Adrian Buss, 24 September 2018

Adrian Buss, Assistant Professor of Finance at INSEAD, discusses how and when new investors should allocate money to new asset classes when they become available. The video was recorded at CEPR's Third Annual Spring Symposiumin April 2018.

Tom Best, Christopher Dielmann, Meghan Greene, Tania Mohd Nor, 06 June 2017

State-contingent debt instruments could provide sovereigns with additional policy space in bad states of the world. This column presents an Excel-based tool that allows debt managers and investors to explore the impact of different designs of such instruments on public debt and gross financing needs under user-specified macroeconomic scenarios (both baseline and shocks). Illustrative results show the potential benefits of different bond designs on both debt and gross financing needs.

Tullio Jappelli, Andreas Hackethal, Michalis Haliassos, 24 September 2009

Do financial advisors aid their clients in making wise investments? This column shows that investors who delegate their portfolio management achieve better results. But that’s due to the fact that advisors tend to be matched with richer, older investors. In fact, financial advisors tend to lower returns and raise risk relative to clients who manage their own investment.

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