John Hassler, Per Krusell, Morten Ravn, Kjetil Storesletten, 07 July 2020

The responses to Covid-19 have had direct economic consequences of historic proportions. In reaction to this challenge, this column was prepared by four main authors and then discussed within a large group of research-active macroeconomists who also signed the final document. The column discusses the nature of the shock and the challenges for economic policy in Europe in the current and next phases of the crisis. In addition to outlining some basic principles for guiding domestic economic policy, it also calls for clear communication of policy to minimise uncertainty, for cooperation across countries along several dimensions, and for a clear and unified strategy in the management of national debts.

Roberto Chang, Andres Velasco, 01 May 2020

Much has been written about the stark choice facing governments in the wake of COVID-19. Should they preserve lives or livelihoods? Less has been said about the equally stark choices facing ordinary citizens, yet the decisions they make every day – whether or not to comply with lockdown and social distancing measures, for instance – are as important as those made by their governments. This column argues that if economic policy incentives are responsible for even a fraction of compliance rates, then policy has a crucial role to play in the fight against Covid-19.

Ghazala Azmat, John Hassler, Andrea Ichino, Per Krusell, Tommaso Monacelli, Moritz Schularick, 17 January 2020

Climate change is at the top of our policy agendas. What can economics contribute to help deal with this important global challenge? With the aim of answering this question, the Managing Editors of Economic Policy are opening a call for papers for a special issue on “The Economics of Climate Change” to bring together the best ideas to inform the debate and provide high-impact policy advice.

Thorsten Beck, Nicola Fuchs-Schündeln, Refet Gürkaynak, Andrea Ichino, 10 February 2016

The Global Crisis was a watershed, not just for economies around the world, but for economics as a discipline. This column introduces a special issue of Economic Policy that collects key papers on the Global Crisis published in its aftermath between 2009 and 2014. The papers chart the evolution of economists’ thinking on the causes of and cures for the Global and EZ Crises. 

John Quiggin, 03 December 2010

John Quiggin of the University of Queensland talks to Viv Davies about his recently published book, which describes some of the economic ideas that he believes played a role in creating the global financial crisis. He refers to the Great Moderation, the efficient markets hypothesis, DSGE, ‘trickle-down’ economics and privatisation as ‘zombie’ ideas, which should have been killed off by the financial crisis, yet for some reason still live on in the minds of many economists and policy-makers. The interview was recorded in London in November 2010. [Also read the transcript]

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The Economics Interest Section of the European Union Studies Association (EUSA) and the Globalization & Monetary Policy Institute of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas are pleased to announce an economics workshop on European Integration. The meeting will be held at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas on 18-19th March, 2010 linked to a one-day public conference that the Institute is organising on 17 March on 10 years of the euro.
Papers on any aspect of European economic integration are welcome, as well as papers that place European integration in the context of the ongoing globalization of trade and capital flows. Abstracts are to be sent to both Patrick Crowley at [email protected] and David Mayes at [email protected] by January 10th, 2010. Please indicate whether you would also be willing to serve as a chair and/or discussant.

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