Karin S. Thorburn, 16 April 2008

US climate change policy relies on corporations voluntarily reducing their greenhouse gas output. But recent research shows that pledging to cut carbon is bad for business, which is why so few firms take such voluntary measures. Reducing carbon emissions will require regulation.

Paul Klemperer, 01 April 2008

Serious scientists worry that feedback effects could - beyond some unknown “tipping point” - cause runaway warming with unforeseeable outcomes that would look like bad science fiction from today’s perspective. The continuing scientific uncertainty should make us more concerned, not less.

Hans Gersbach, 11 February 2008

Tackling climate change is difficult because it requires international cooperation to address global externalities. This column proposes a global refunding system, which would provide incentives for emissions reductions while allowing member countries to choose their carbon tax rates.

Carlo Carraro, Valentina Bosetti, Emanuele Massetti, Massimo Tavoni, 24 January 2008

If the world wants to stabilise atmospheric greenhouse gases at 550 parts per million, massive changes are required, especially in the energy sector. This article discusses means and costs of drastically reducing carbon emissions.

Paul Klemperer, 13 December 2007

No climate-change strategy will work unless it is consistent with developing countries' continued growth. So curbing emissions requires cheaper clean energy than is currently available. And that requires innovation.

Ralf Martin, 12 December 2007

A new climate change prediction market has been launched. Here are the details on motivation and participation.

Nicholas Stern, 30 November 2007

Targets and trading must be at the heart of a global agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to Sir Nicholas Stern delivering the Royal Economic Society’s 2007 annual public lecture today, ahead of next week’s world summit on climate change in Bali.

Hans-Werner Sinn, 31 October 2007

EU leaders don’t determine the pace of climate change. Demand reduction by some consumers only lowers fossil fuel consumption to the degree that resource owners decide to curtail their supply. Ultimately, the volume of fossil fuel burnt globally depends upon the rate of extraction and this is in the hands of oil producers who care about carbon’s intertemporal price path. Policies aimed at lowering carbon demand without concern for the price path of carbon may backfire.

Paul Klemperer, 03 August 2007

Three critical questions need to be answered by scientists, sociologists and philosophers to get climate change policy right.

Jeffrey Frankel, 25 June 2007

Quantitative emission targets for the 21st century must be set sequentially, a decade at a time, within a long-term framework. A good analogy is the GATT, which produced 50 years of trade liberalisation, the specifics of which the original signers could only have guessed.

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