João Ayres, Pablo Andrés Neumeyer, Andrew Powell, 19 July 2021

The ‘right’ monetary policy response to COVID-19 has depended on any number of factors for central banks across the world. This column argues that some central banks in Latin American and Caribbean went beyond accommodating the increased demand for liquidity, inducing monetary injections that then returned through excess bank reserves and sterilisation liabilities for those central banks that fixed an interest rate, and through sales of international reserves for those that favoured stable exchange rates. The authors also outline some of the risks confronting central banks for the months ahead.

Eduardo Cavallo, Andrew Powell, 13 April 2021

Latin America and the Caribbean suffered from several regional preconditions in advance of the Covid-19 crisis, including weak health infrastructure, low growth, and inefficient taxation. Now the pandemic threatens to leave the region with even higher poverty levels, greater inequality, and debts across virtually all countries. This column recognises the severity of these challenges but also provides reason to hope. If Covid-19 produces the political will to move the region towards better policy frameworks and execution, something positive could come of the crisis.

Eduardo Cavallo, Andrew Powell, 19 April 2018

The rate of economic growth in Latin America and the Caribbean in coming years is predicted to be below that of the rest of the world and substantially below that of the fast-growing countries of emerging Asia. This column looks at the drivers behind these growth gaps. To converge more rapidly to higher-income status, the region needs not only to boost investment but critically to raise investment efficiency.

Matias Busso, Julian Cristia, Diana Hincapié, Julián Messina, Laura Ripani, 16 October 2017

Skills-development policies are needed in Latin America and the Caribbean to close the region’s productivity gap with the rest of the world, and at the same time help close the gap between those who began life with and without advantages or opportunities. This column presents the new IADB flagship report, which aims to help governments address these issues by providing detailed, evidence-based analysis of what works and what doesn’t.

Bárbara Castelletti, Jeff Dayton-Johnson, Ángel Melguizo, 19 March 2010

The economic effects of immigration are often controversial. This column introduces the preliminary findings from a new database on immigration in Latin America and the Caribbean. While immigrants do not seem to displace domestic workers, they are often working in sectors unsuitable for their skills. Better policy could help the destination countries as well as the immigrants themselves.

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