Branko Milanovic, Peter Lindert, Jeffrey Williamson, 05 December 2007

Is inequality largely the result of the Industrial Revolution? Or were ancient incomes as unequal as they are today in poor pre-industrial societies? Looking at pre-industrial inequality from the Roman Empire in 14 AD to British India in 1947 generates new insights into the inequality and economic development connection over the very long run.

Pedro Carneiro, Costas Meghir, Matthias Parey, 22 November 2007

New research shows that raising the level of mothers’ education pays large intergenerational returns with kids benefiting, for example, from extra parental investment in their education. Policies that promote women’s education should take account of this in their design and evaluation.

Alberto Alesina, Francesco Giavazzi, 05 October 2007

Anti-reformists in Europe claim to be protecting Europe’s weak and poor. Nothing could be further from the truth. Labour-market flexibility, deregulation of the service industry, pension reforms and greater competition in university funding might harm the interest of well-connected, privileged citizens but it would open up opportunities for Europe’s youth and disadvantaged groups. A real left-wing agenda would embrace reform.

Indraneel Dasgupta, Ravi Kanbur, 02 July 2007

Rich individuals are encouraged to make large contributions to the provision of public goods in return for tax exemptions, a policy that appears to endorse the claim that philanthropy can be considered a substitute for the direct income redistribution brought about through taxation. The authors of CEPR DP6362 address the question of how voluntary provision affects welfare inequality and find that (1) philanthropy can in fact increase inequality among the non-rich, but (2) income redistribution can be more effective in reducing inequality when accompanied by philanthropy. Automatic exemption from expropriation for rich philanthropists is therefore not the right policy.

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