Sangmin Aum, Tim Lee, Yongseok Shin, 04 July 2018

The past three decades have seen unprecedented technological development, with major impacts on labour markets and the economy as a whole. This column investigates how automation and the increased use of computers has affected productivity trends over the last three decades. Results suggest that automation has had a strong effect on slowing down aggregate productivity, despite raising it at the micro level. This is due to the reallocation of factor inputs across occupations and industries. 

Francisco Gallego, Ofer Malamud, Cristian Pop-Eleches, 08 April 2018

The potential risks and benefits to children of using computers are likely to depend on parental involvement. Based on a study in Chile, this column examines two factors that may affect parents’ ability to monitor their children’s internet use – lack of information and lack of influence. Providing parents with specific information about their children’s internet use was found to affect behaviour, while helping parents directly control their children’s internet access did not.

Carl Benedikt Frey, Ebrahim Rahbari, 25 March 2016

Back in the 1960s, many thought that the computer and automation would herald less work and more leisure, but the debate has changed. These days, economists debate the extent to which jobs will be lost due to technological innovation. This column explores whether technology is becoming more labour-saving and less job-creating. Concerns over automation causing mass unemployment seem exaggerated, at least for now. 

Ofer Malamud, Cristian Pop-Eleches, 21 July 2010

Do policies to bridge the digital divide, such as the One Laptop per Child programme, work? This column analyses a scheme offering vouchers for home computers to low-income families in Romania. It finds that while children’s computer skills and cognitive ability increased, academic achievement fell, suggesting that such policies should not overlook how children use these computers and the role played by parents.

Events

CEPR Policy Research