Ejaz Ghani, William Kerr, Stephen O'Connell, 26 February 2012

Entrepreneurship is often held aloft as the missing ingredient for growth in many economies, particularly developing countries. But for many policymakers, entrepreneurs are a mystery. This column looks at India and asks why entrepreneurs locate where they do.

Luigi Guiso, Aldo Rustichini, 17 January 2011

Why are women so under-represented among entrepreneurs? Are women intrinsically ill-suited to the risk-taking and competition of entrepreneurship? Or is it social norms that impede them? The authors of CEPR DP8204 test these theories and argue that sexist culture keeps even high-ability women from becoming entrepreneurs.

William Kerr, Ramana Nanda, 27 April 2010

How should a government promote entrepreneurship? This column argues that providing support programmes for targeted sectors or companies is akin to “picking winners ex ante”. A far better approach is to encourage competition in the financial sector that facilitates experimentation in the real economy. Governments should forget about picking winners and focus on picking the right system.

Josh Lerner, 12 March 2010

Josh Lerner of Harvard Business School talks to Vox about the policies that governments employ to encourage venture capital and entrepreneurial activity, drawing on the findings in his book, Boulevard of Broken Dreams: Why Public Efforts to Boost Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital Have Failed – and What to Do About It. The interview was recorded in London in January 2010.

Josh Lerner, 12 February 2010

Josh Lerner of Harvard Business School talks to Vox about sovereign wealth funds, which are the focus of a chapter in his new book, Boulevard of Broken Dreams: Why Public Efforts to Boost Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital Have Failed – and What to Do About It. The interview was recorded in London in January 2010.

Edward Glaeser, William Kerr, 26 November 2008

Many academics, policy makers, and business leaders stress the importance of local conditions for explaining spatial differences in entrepreneurship and economic development. This column assesses the importance of various forces for agglomeration. The empirical evidence suggests that market effects, such as proximity to input suppliers and labour market pooling, play a big role, while there is less support for factors like entrepreneurial culture and industrial diversity.

Josh Lerner, 22 August 2008

Where do clusters of entrepreneurs come from? Josh Lerner of Harvard Business School talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about his research on peer effects and early-career entrepreneurship, which analyses data on HBS alumni. The interview was recorded at the American Economic Association meetings in New Orleans in January 2008.

David Audretsch, 22 August 2008

David Audretsch of the Max Planck Institute of Economics and Indiana University talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about his research programme on entrepreneurship – the key institutional drivers and constraints; the impact of globalisation and new technology; the links to growth and competitiveness; and the public policy issues. The interview was recorded at the American Economic Association meetings in New Orleans in January 2008.

Hans Hvide, 28 September 2007

More liquidity is good for entrepreneurs, but not always. New empirical analysis gives evidence on a hypothesis formulated by Adam Smith and suggests directions for policy discussions.

David Audretsch, Werner Bönte, Jagannadha Tamvada, 09 July 2007

By examining whether religion has any impact on decision-making that promotes economic growth, i.e. the decision to become an entrepreneur, the authors of DP6378 aim to shed light on two questions: (1) What are the channels by which religion influences economics and (2) Are the impacts on economic activity the same across all religions?

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